Search Results for: uploadgig

Allen Reisner – All Mine to Give (1957)

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This is a story based on fact that follows a husband and wife who emigrate from Scotland to Wisconsin in the 1850’s. They work very hard and become welcome citizens of their new town, Eureka. They have six children. They prosper in the husband’s boat building business. But when their eldest is 12, tragedy strikes the family, and the 12-year old is burdened with a terrible task which he handles as well as any adult could. Continue reading

Fernando Di Leo – Milano calibro 9 (1972)

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Milan Calibre 9 (made in 1971 and released the following year) is the first chapter of the famous “Milieu Trilogy”, continued with Manhunt (La mala ordina) and ending with The Boss (Il boss) in which Fernando di Leo explores the different aspects of the world of organized crime. The title of the film is taken from a story by Giorgio Scerbanenco which is part of the book I Centodelitti. This Russian writer also inspired certain parts of scripts ( Stazione centrale ammazzare subitofor the bomb package, Vietato essere felici and La vendetta è il miglior perdono for certain characteristics belonging to the main character, Ugo Piazza). But basically, di Leo created this film independently, using the noir genre as a vehicle for his own sociological, anthropological and also philosophical ideas about the world of crime. Continue reading

Ishirô Honda & Terry Morse – Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956)

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American reporter Steve Martin, on his way to Cairo for an assignment, has a stop over in Tokyo. During the layover, he decides to visit his old friend Dr. Daisuke Serizawa. However, the night before he lands, his plane passes over an area where a ship suddenly exploded and caught fire killing all hands. Continue reading

Louis Delluc – La femme de nulle part (1922)

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Synopsis:
Like his fiery study of a popular milieu in Fièvre, Louis Delluc’s early masterpiece of impressionist cinema, La Femme de Nulle Part, is almost impossible to see outside of rare archival projections in Paris. Shot in natural settings, and stripped of all that is not cinema, Delluc’s psychological drama featuring symbolist muse Eve Francis is an experiment in ‘direct style.’ A fascinating study in the relationship between past and present, memory, dream and reality, this revolutionary film would be a source of inspiration for successive filmmakers, from Francois Truffaut to Alain Resnais. Continue reading

Eric Rohmer – 4 aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle (1987)

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In 4 adventures of Reinette and Mirebelle directed by Eric Rohmer in 1987 the main protagonists are two girls of very different character. Reinette is a country girl, rough and direct, but at the same time very sweet. Mirabelle is city girl, more contemplative and intellectial. They happen to meet by accident in the country and spend a few days together, after which Mirabelle invites Reinette, who wants to stydy painting in Paris, to stay in her apartment. Following this the two friends venture on four “adventures” which all turn around the theme of speech and silence. Continue reading

Abel Gance – Napoléon Bonaparte (1935)

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2011 restoration by La Cinémathèque Française of the re-edited sound version of Abel Gance’s 1927 epic silent film “Napoleon”.

French language only, no english subtitles.

One of the most high-profile casualties of the transition from silent to sound cinema was the French filmmaker Abel Gance. In the silent era, Gance had proven himself to be as great a cineaste as the other legendary pioneers of cinema, D.W. Griffith and Sergei Eisenstein, through a series of groundbreaking masterpieces that included J’accuse! (1919), La Roue (1923) and Napoléon (1927). It was the latter film that was to earn Gance particular acclaim and lasting recognition as one of the architects of cinema art, a five hour visionary epic that presented the early career of Napoléon Bonaparte with a visual artistry and panache that is, to this day, virtually unrivalled. As he struggled to make much of an impact with his sound films, it was inevitable that Gance would return to his earlier great achievement and give it a voice. His sound version of Napoléon would prove to be both a monumental piece of cinema in its own right and a terribly prescient foretaste of the cataclysmic events that would soon overtake Europe in the mid-to-late 1930s. Continue reading