Pat O’Neill – Screen (1969)

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Screen (Pat O’Neill, 1969, digital (originally 16mm), color, silent, 4min.)
A less-well known work by O’Neill, originally intended as an installation.
Consider supporting the filmmaker. Read More »

Karel Reisz – Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis
The sights and sounds of industrial Nottingham resonate with a grimy thud as Arthur Seaton works his tedious factory job. Through ale, women and practical jokes, he vents his frustrations against the “establishments” of work and marriage… until his reckless ways lead him to a night that changes his life. Forced to reevaluate his convictions, Arthur must decide exactly what he stands for. Read More »

Tinto Brass – Il disco volante aka The Flying Saucer (1964)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:

A gem! This is one of the last of the great movie comedies. Famous producer Dino De Laurentiis hired Brass to direct Rodolfo Sonego’s satirical political parable, “Il disco volante”, starring Alberto Sordi in four rôles, along with Silvana Mangano and Monica Vitti. Brass’s direction is flawlessly smooth, Sordi is at his most brilliant with his priceless doubletakes, and the film is screamingly funny. But since Brass did not write or edit it, “Il disco volante” is not a true-blue Brass film, though its anti-authoritarianism is certainly congenial to his outlook. The story concerns witnesses to some flying saucers that land in a village near Venice. They spin enough yarns that the police are brought in to arrest the visitors, but plans go awry when the aliens just want to party and when a few villagers start trafficking in Martians. Good movies are impossible to describe. Good comedies are even more impossible to describe. Take my word for it, though, you’ll like it! Read More »

Tinto Brass – L’Urlo aka The Howl (1970)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

from imdb user comment:

“2 Eggs; to break, broke, broken”, the only English phrase and theme song spoken in Tinto Brass’ “L’Urlo”. What a film! The only available version of this film I could find had no subtitles. Either way it doesn’t matter since it is very visual. When most people here the name Tinto Brass, right away they think of the horrid sleaze epic “Caligula”, or some might name “Salon Kitty”. If your lucky, you’ll here of some who have seen his fun slapstick sex comedies from Italy like “Miranda” and “All Ladies Do it”. Known mainly for his lighthearted sex romps with curvy women, Tinto Brass’ earliest experimental films were much different. Heres a recipe for a film like “L’Urlo”. Take some Fellini, add some Jodorowsky/Arrabal and a little table spoon of Godard for extra kick, stir and you got yourself “L’Urlo”. One crazy psychedelic, surrealist anti-war art orgy. A bus is lit on fire! Hippies are chased by riot cops. There’s stock footage of Vietnam and other wars with a machine gun showdown! S&M, slapstick sexuality, a man’s pursuit of a beautiful lady… abstract art and nudity galore! Most memorable is a man in a gas mask jumping around with nude people while goose feather’s fill the air! One amazing experimental protest movie! Rebel art at its finest! Read More »

Malcolm J. Thomson – David Bowie – Love You Till Tuesday (1969)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Love You till Tuesday was a promotional film designed to showcase the talents of David Bowie, made in 1969. The film was the latest attempt by his manager, Kenneth Pitt, to bring Bowie to a wider audience. Pitt had undertaken the film after a suggestion by Gunther Schnedier, producer of German TV show ‘4-3-2-1 Musik Für Junge Leute’ for the ZDF network. Read More »

Serge Roullet – Le Mur aka The Wall (1967)

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

A cult movie with the affluent lesson learned of the teacher Robert Bresson. Dialogues by Jean Paul Sartre. A masterpiece.

Plot
Spain at the beginning of the civil war. Three men are stopped by the pro-Franco ones and put in cell, after being condemned to be shot at dawn. Begin their last night then… Read More »

Allan Dwan – Man to Man (1930)

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot: Man to Man refers to the relationship between father John Bolton (Grant Mitchell) and son Michael (Phillips Holmes) — or least, to the relationship as it should be. After serving a prison sentence for homicide (established by the screenwriters as justifiable), John starts life anew as a small-town barber. When Michael learns the truth about John’s past, it causes a rift in the relationship between the two men. But when Michael is accused of embezzlement, John gallantly shoulders the blame, even though he believes his son to be guilty — while Michael, convinced that his dad stole the money, refuses to recant his confession. Only after the true culprit is exposed are father and son tearfully reunited. Dwight Frye does his patented “Renfield” overacting in a minor role. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Read More »