Antonio Pietrangeli – La Parmigiana AKA The Girl from Parma [+Extras] (1963)

Synopsis
Forced to leave her village because of a scandalous love affair with a seminarian, Dora looks for work and refuge in Parma, where she becomes involved with a petty criminal. Another of Pietrangeli’s bitter comedies of deracination, reflecting the sudden urbanization of Italy during the industrial boom years of the 1950s and 1960s. Read More »

Mario Monicelli – Proibito (1954)

Don Paolo, a young parson troubled by his love for Agnese, tries to make peace in a little village in Sardinia where two families are at war.

Don Paolo, Sardinian priest, returns home as a pastor in his native town, torn by hatred and revenge. He tries to restore peace and confidence in the law and deter Agnes, in love with him. He succeeds, but it’s hard.
In the film’s figurative and narrative scheme, in his vague westerns impression, fostered by the intense beauty of the landscape, the character of Nazzari, compared to the somewhat fuzzy others, has coherence and vitality. Read More »

Teruo Ishii – Nyotai sanbashi aka Flesh Pier (1958)

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Director Teruo Ishi’s crime action follows the investigative adventures of an undercover cop working with a prostitution ring. It’s done in an unique documentary style Read More »

Marcin Wrona – Czlowiek magnes AKA Magnet Man (2001)

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The film is inspired by the director’s unusual family history, which evokes childhood memories marked by specific relationships with parents.

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A true story about the filmmaker’s father, a mesmerist, exorcist, and healer who can help everyone but himself. Told from the point of view of his young son (the filmmaker as a boy), who both adores and abhors his father. Marcin Wrona uses a visually energetic collage technique to create what he calls “tragicomic kitsch,” one with a fantastical sense of Monty Python about it, like a missing Terry Gilliam project. Read More »

Chuck Jones – Rabbit Fire (1951)

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Daffy Duck and Bugs argue back and forth whether it is duck season or rabbit season. The object of their arguments is hunter Elmer Fudd. Read More »

Chuck Jones – Rabbit Seasoning (1952)

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Daffy Duck tricks Elmer Fudd into believing it’s rabbit season; but Bugs Bunny uses a female disguise and faulty pronouns to fight back. Read More »

Chuck Jones – Duck! Rabbit, Duck! (1953)

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The final installment of the “Hunting Trilogy” once again has Elmer out hunting, while Bugs and Daffy try to con him into shooting the other. Read More »