Grossman’s Guitar Workshop – Legends Of Country Blues Guitar Vol.2 (1994)

The blues “rediscovery” era of the 1960s brought to concert and sound stages many veteran artists who had participated in the “Golden Age” of country blues recording prior to World War II. The best of them retained much of their youthful power and brought with them the authority of experience. While these artists have since passed on, their recorded legacy is enhanced by these extraordinary performance clips.
The first generation of recorded Delta bluesmen – Charley Patton, Tommy Johnson, the Mississippi Sheiks – is echoed in the stark and powerful performances of Bukka White, Sam Chatmon, Big Joe Williams, Houston Stackhouse and Son House. Read More »

Grossman’s Guitar Workshop – Legends Of Country Blues Guitar Vol.1 (1994)

Blues music was developed at the beginning of the twentieth century by rural black musicians. They shaped it with brilliant inspiration from disparate elements of black song. By the early 1920s recorded urban performers solidified the standard three-verse, 12 bar meter structure that has identified most blues.
The blues revival of the early 1960s brought many of these survivors to the forefront of traditional music. The rare footage presented in this video is a treasure beyond imagining, drawn from a myriad of sources, depicting some of the greatest blues musicians who ever lived. Read More »

Roy Ward Baker – Quatermass and the Pit (1967)

Synopsis:
Workers excavating at an underground station in London uncover the skeletal remains of ancient apes with large skulls. Further digging reveals what is at first believed to be an unexploded German bomb from World War II. Missile expert Colonel Breen is brought in to investigate, accompanied by Professor Bernard Quartermass. When the interior of the “missile” is exposed, a dead locust-like creature that resembles the devil is found. It is determined by Quartermass that these “locusts” are evil Martians who altered the brains of our simian ancestors to eventually lay claim to the Earth. When Quartermass’s suspicion that the missile can reactivate the dormant evil in humans is confirmed, all hell breaks loose. Read More »

William A. Fraker – Monte Walsh (1970)

Synopsis:
Monte Walsh (Lee Marvin ) and his pal Chet Rollins (Jack Palance) are two over the hill cowboys seeking work in the town of Harmony, Arizona in the final days of the Old West. As barbed wire and railways steadily eliminate the need for the cowboy, Monte and his friends are left with fewer and fewer options. New work opportunities are available to them, but the freedom of the open prairie is what they long for. Eventually, they all must say goodbye to the lives they knew, and try to make a new start. Read More »

Roger Corman – The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre (1967)

Synopsis:
Chicago February 14th 1929. Al Capone finally establishes himself as the city’s boss of organised crime. In a north-side garage his hoods, dressed as policemen, surprise and mow down with machine-guns the key members of Bugs Moran’s rival gang. The film traces the history of the incident, and the lives affected and in some cases ended by it. Read More »

Nestor Paternostro – Mosaico (1970)

“Mosaico (La vida de una modelo)” is Néstor Paternostro’s first film. It follows the life of a model (Perla Caron), from her discovery by a TV producer (Federico Luppi) to the moment when she decides to stop modeling. The narration is fragmentary (“so that each spectator can build his own movie”, as said by Paternostro himself), and the movie is constructed mainly around the music by Núñez Palacios and rock singer Owe Monk. Read More »

Rudolph Maté – The 300 Spartans (1962)

A colorful action film about the Battle Of Thermopylae in 480 B.C. in which the Spartans defend themselves for a Persian invasion against overwhelming odds. King Leodinas (Richard Egan) rallies the locals to stop the attack of thousands of plundering Persian invaders led by evil King Xerxes (David Farrar). Sir Ralph Richardson as Themistocles of Athens leads the international cast this the spectacular cinematic conflict that has more emphasis on action rather than historical accuracy.
— Dan Pavlides Read More »