Tag Archives: 1960s

Masahiro Shinoda – Yûhi ni akai ore no kao AKA Killers On Parade (1961)

Mod-sixties visuals and black humor mark this wild New Wave masterpiece about a vengeful contractor who hires a series of young killers to target a woman muckraker. Trouble brews when an amateur marksman shows up his eclectic competition. Directed from a script by Shuji Terayama, Shinoda’s colorful showcase of action (and unexpected song!) has been compared to a pastiche of Pierrot le Fou and Kubrick’s The Killing. —NYFF 2010 Read More »

Rudolph Cartier – BBC Play of the Month: An Ideal Husband (1969)

An Ideal Husband (BBC1, 1969, dir. Rudolph Cartier)

Rudolph Cartier’s Play of the Month version of Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband (1895) shares the same aesthetic of visual pleasure realised through detail as Cedric Messina’s Pygmalion (BBC1 16 December 1973), as well as many common features of setting and dressing; ballrooms, studies, morning rooms, elegant dresses and eveningwear. However, Cartier’s directorial technique demonstrates a greater awareness of the possibilities of studio technique to comment upon the action of a play, and is an exemplary production in its use of finely realised period detail to achieve dramatic effects, as an interpretation that works on deeper levels than surface aesthetic visual pleasure. Read More »

Janusz Majewski – Ja gore! (1968)

Ja gore! / I Am Burning 1967. Part of TV anthology: Opowiesci Niezwykle (The Amazing Stories). Written and directed by Janusz Majewski. Based on Henryk Rzewuski’s short story.HDTVRip 720p (TVP1 HD broadcast).

Awards: Brazowy Lajkonik in the feature film category at the Cracow Short Feature Festival, 1968. Read More »

David Lynch – The Alphabet (1968)

After Six Figures Getting Sick, Lynch was reluctant to continue working in film due to the high cost involved. However, fellow student H. Barton Wasserman saw Lynch’s moving painting, and gave him $1000 to create similar one. “He (Wasserman) would buy a projector and mount it to the floor next to his chair and it would be bolted down, so he’d just click on the projector and have a screen that this thing would play on. And when the projector was off, the screen would be just like a piece of sculpture.”1 Lynch used $450 of the money to buy a used Bolex camera, then went to work filming. After two months of work, he took the film to be developed, only to discover the film didn’t turn out. Read More »

Jacinto Esteva & Joaquim Jordà – Dante no es únicamente severo (1967)

IMDB wrote:
The impossible relationship between a man and a woman, but also the destruction of aesthetics. The girl wants to seduce her beloved with incoherent stories that he does not care at all. Through this relationship, the film projects the idea according to which it is impossible to tell a story. The project does not pursue the coherence of a well-told story, rather it demands to observe what is shown and to deepen the different facets of the characters. Its purpose is to lay the foundations of a certain pop aesthetic in a Spanish way, in which the images can not refer to the world but to the publicity that the world sells to us. Read More »

Montgomery Tully – Out of the Fog (1962)

‘Out of the Fog’ (1962) stars David Sumner as a Scotland Yard policeman assigned the task of catching an elusive killer. The murderer only strikes during full moons and favours blondes, which leads George Mallon (Sumner) to formulate a plan that involves using the beautiful June (Susan Travers) to lure the criminal into the open. However, the plot is fraught with danger. Read More »

Sergio Leone – C’era una volta il West AKA Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

Synopsis:
There’s a single piece of land around Flagstone with water on it, and rail baron Morton (Gabriele Ferzetti) aims to have it, knowing the new railroad will have to stop there. He sends his henchman Frank (Henry Fonda) to scare the land’s owner, McBain (Frank Wolff), but Frank kills him instead and pins it on a known bandit, Cheyenne (Jason Robards). Meanwhile, a mysterious gunslinger with a score to settle (Charles Bronson) and McBain’s new wife, Jill (Claudia Cardinale), arrive in town. Read More »