Tag Archives: 1960s

James Hill – The Dock Brief AKA Trial and Error (1962)

Synopsis
An incompetent lawyer defends an accused wife murderer. Read More »

Rollan Sergiyenko – Belye tuchi AKA Bili Khmary AKA White Clouds (1968)

Quote:
THE LOST MASTERPIECE OF SOVIET CINEMA

Belye Tuchi – or as it should be called, Bili Khmary – is a movie that has somehow got lost and is now all but forgotten. The title is usually translated into English as White Clouds but it’s really closer to something like “the dark clouds are coming” but any translation will be miss the correct subtle meaning. The movie was directed by the Ukrainian Rollan Serhiienko, although IMDb mistakenly lists him as Sergiyenko. He was better known as a documentary film maker and later made the award winning Bell of Chernobyl. His career as a feature film director only produced two movies of which this is the best. Read More »

Zivojin Pavlovic – Neprijatelj (1965)

Quote:
At the time when Sovražnik (1965) was filmed , Živojin Pavlović had only two omnibuses that he made with colleagues from the Belgrade Cinema Club, Kapi, vode, ratnici and Grad . The latter was banned by the court, as the only Yugoslav film of that period (produced by the Sarajevo Sutjeska film) to suffer such a fate. It was much more common for a controversial film to end up in the producer’s “bunker” and for permission to be shown at all. This is how Pavlović’s first feature film Return (1964), produced in Belgrade’s Avala Film, went through , and in the meantime he received an offer to direct in Slovenia: he and writer Bora Ćosić adapted FM Dostoevsky’s story, but adapted it to modern times. Read More »

Chadi Abdel Salam – Al-mummia AKA The Night of Counting the Years (1969)

In the late 1800s, an isolated Egyptian mountain clan sustains itself by exploiting Egypt’s ancient heritage, secretly raiding the tombs of the Pharaohs in Thebes. “One of the greatest Egyptian films ever made, Al-Mummia has an extremely unusual tone – stately, poetic, with a powerful grasp of time and the sadness it carries. The carefully measured pace, the almost ceremonial movement of the camera, the classical Arabic spoken on the soundtrack, the unsettling score by the great Italian composer Mario Nascimbene – they all work in perfect harmony… This picture has a sense of history like no other, and in the end, the film is strangely, even hauntingly consoling – the final understanding of who and what we are” (Martin Scorsese). Read More »

Jean-Claude Brisseau – Dimanche après-midi (1966-1967)

Quote:
Lisa Heredia, la veuve et la monteuse de Jean-Claude Brisseau, nous a confié ces films. Ce sont ses tout premiers essais, qu’il a montrés quelques années plus tard à Eric Rohmer, qui en fut enthousiasmé et qu’il l’a introduit auprès [de la maison de production] des Films du Losange. Comme il est pour l’instant peu probable que la société nous permette de reprogrammer la rétrospective qui aurait dû lui être consacrée, nous avons jugé de notre devoir de montrer ces films sur notre plate-forme pour compléter la connaissance qui est due à tout grand cinéaste. (Frédéric Bonnaud, Le Monde) . Read More »

John Sturges – The Great Escape (1963)

Summary:
Based on a true story by Paul Brickhill, this epic adventure about a mass escape planned by Allied officers being kept in an elite German P.O.W. camp, especially designed to prevent it, is a great World War II movie spectacle. John Sturges directed the film whose screenplay was in part written by James Clavell. The all star cast makes every storyline interesting and includes: Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence, James Coburn, and David McCallum among others. Though it’s only Oscar recognition was a nomination for Editing, its score is also memorable. #19 on AFI’s Most Heart-Pounding Movies list. Read More »

Éric Rohmer – La boulangère de Monceau AKA The Bakery Girl of Monceau (1963)

A law student regularly visits a Paris bakery to flirt with a brunette employee. Read More »