Tag Archives: 1960s

Zivorad ‘Zika’ Mitrovic – Do pobedata i po nea AKA Before and After the Victory AKA Do pobede i dalje (1966)

A newly established communist authorities in Yugoslavia face the moral challenge of how to deal with warriors of defeated side and other enemies of the regime. Read More »

Seijun Suzuki – Yumeji (1991)

Synopsis:
Yumeji is the final film in youth-gone-berserk auteur Seijun Suzuki’s acclaimed Taisho Trilogy. Sensual and absurdist, it spins a ghost story around the character and work of real-life painter and poet Yumeji Takehisa (1884-1934). The eponymous character — conjured by Suzuki as a chronic philanderer and dreamer played by former rock star Kenji Sawada — is plagued with ideals of perfect beauty and the terror of his own demise. He falls in love with women, but can never capture their hearts. He is constantly escaping his rivals, but can never face them down. Read More »

Kimiyoshi Yasuda – Zatôichi hatashi-jô AKA Zatoichi and the Fugitives (1968)

Synopsis:
Blind masseur and master swordsman Zatoichi becomes involved with a gang of bandits hiding out in a small village. While they hide in the attic of a silk mill, they manipulate the corrupt chief official of the town. Simultaneously Zatoichi tries to rescue a young woman from the sweatshop conditions of the mill. Eventually he must confront not only the leaders of the town but the outlaw gang in battle. Read More »

Kenji Misumi – Zatoichi Jigoku tabi AKA Zatoichi and the Chess Expert (1965)

Synopsis:
Zatoichi makes friends with a dangerous chess player, while fending off angry yakuza and bloodthirsty relatives out for revenge, and trying to save a sick child. Meanwhile, his luck with dice is turning… Read More »

Zivorad ‘Zika’ Mitrovic – Solunskite Atentatori AKA The Assassins from Salonika (1961)

Content:
Wishing to draw the attention of world public opinion to the situation in Macedonia under Ottoman rule, a group of Macedonian-socialists, sons of wealthy merchants from Veles, who live and study in Salonica, and who are strongly influenced by Russian nihilist literature and the Geneva anarchists, decide in April 1903 to make a series of attacks on various business concerns in which foreign capital has been invested. The targets of the attacks are the French vessel “Guadalquivir”, the Ottoman Bank, the Electricity plant and the G. P. O. in Salonica. The achievement of their aims means death for the activists themselves. But they give up their lives willingly for a holy cause – the freedom of Macedonia. Read More »

Jack Bond – Dali in New York (1965)

Filmmaker Jack Bond and Salvador Dali got together at Christmas 1965 to make Dali in New York, a highly entertaining film. Dali devoted two weeks of his life to creating extraordinary scenes for the film, performing “manifestations” with a plaster cast, a thousand ants and one million dollars in cash. When he confronts the feminist writer, Jane Arden, sparks fly. “You are my slave!”. “I am not your slave”. “Everybody is my slave”. Read More »

Evald Schorm – Kazdy den odvahu AKA Courage for Every Day (1964)

Synopsis:
“Everyday Courage” or “Courage for Every Day” is a beautifully made fllm of great poetic restraint about a young man living in Prague before the collapse of communism. It is best described as belonging to the school of realism which marked the Czech films of the sixties, and its director, Evald Schorm, was noted for his refusal to compromise the subject matter or style of his films with the regime which controlled the film studios. An admirer of the films of the British director Lindsay Anderson, “Everyday Courage” has similarities with”This Sporting Life”, its hero striving to escape the repressive forces of a society against which he rebels, but which ultimately demoralizes him and undermines his personal relationships. The winner of the International Film Festival in 1965 it has been notably neglected, and was one of the most moving and lyrical films to emerge from the Czech school. Read More »