Tag Archives: 1970s

Masao Adachi & Haruhiko Arai – Funshutsu kigan – 15-sai no baishunfu AKA Gushing Prayer: A 15-Year-Old Prostitute (1971)

Synopsis:
A young prostitute tries to understand why she suffers from melancholy and benumbed feelings. Against a background of sexual liberation and political subversion, this latest libertine work by radical film director M. Adachi is one of the very few existing feminist erotic films. Masao Adachi’s personality and films deserve careful consideration. Relatively unknown as yet to Western audiences, he happens to be one of the most radical film-makers around in recent years. Gushing Prayer, shows the influence of Koji Wakamatsu, another enfant terrible of Japanese cinema whom Adachi assisted on many films. Gushing Prayer does not hesitate to show the resentments and dissatisfactions of someone who ought to be nothing more than an object of fantasies. Highly pertinent, with a bold avant-garde style, he sets the record straight as far as the sexual desires of supposedly liberated Japanese women are concerned. One of the rare feminist films of the 70’s, it audaciously evokes sexual liberation and political subversion. Read More »

Kimiyoshi Yasuda – Shin zatô Ichi: Yabure! Tôjin-ken AKA Zatoichi Meets the One-Armed Swordsman (1971)

Synopsis:
Zatoichi the blind masseur and crack swordsman finds trouble in the edge of town in this 22nd installment of the classic samurai film series. When Zatoichi confronts the master Chinese martial artist Wang Kang and his young traveling companion, the blind swordsman finds that the duo are trying to escape from a group of terroristic samurai who have killed the boy’s parents. Zatoichi agrees to help them, but the rescue becomes complicated when he must rescue not only Wang Kang and the boy, but also everyone who they meet along the way! Read More »

Kimiyoshi Yasuda – Shin Zatôichi monogatari: Kasama no chimatsuri AKA Zatoichi’s Conspiracy AKA Zatoichi at the Blood Fest (1973)

Zatoichi returns to his home village for the first time in over ten years to find much has changed and that corruption abounds. Read More »

Madeline Anderson – I Am Somebody (1970)

Quote:
In 1969, 400 poorly paid black women — hospital workers in Charleston, South Carolina — went on strike to demand union recognition and a wage increase, only to find themselves in a confrontation with the National Guard and the state government.

Supported by such notables as Andrew Young, Charles Abernathy, and Coretta Scott King, the women nonetheless conducted a strike under the guidance of District 1199, the New York based union, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Read More »

Satsuo Yamamoto – Senso to ningen III: Kanketsuhen AKA Men And War Part III (1973)

Quote:
Yamamoto Satsuo directed this masterful 9 hour epic trilogy on the effects of war on the five generations of a single Japanese family. Based on Gomikawa Jumpei’s (The Human Condition) bestselling novel, the film trilogy skillfully blends newsreel and archive footage with an all-star cast, exotic locations, and beautiful cinematography. The first part follows the rise of the Godai clan rise from war-profiteers to their becoming powerful industrialists in Japanese-occupied Manchuria during the 1930s. The second part follow the the stories of two brothers serving in different units of the Imperial Japanese army from 1935 to 1937 when Japan launched a full scale invasion of China. The third and final part details the family’s trials during the Sino-Japanese War to the Soviet army’s invasion of Japanese-occupied Northeastern China at the end of World War II. Read More »

Satsuo Yamamoto – Senso to ningen II: Ai to kanashimino sanga AKA Men And War Part II (1971)

Quote:
Yamamoto Satsuo directed this masterful 9 hour epic trilogy on the effects of war on the five generations of a single Japanese family. Based on Gomikawa Jumpei’s (The Human Condition) bestselling novel, the film trilogy skillfully blends newsreel and archive footage with an all-star cast, exotic locations, and beautiful cinematography. The first part follows the rise of the Godai clan rise from war-profiteers to their becoming powerful industrialists in Japanese-occupied Manchuria during the 1930s. The second part follow the the stories of two brothers serving in different units of the Imperial Japanese army from 1935 to 1937 when Japan launched a full scale invasion of China. The third and final part details the family’s trials during the Sino-Japanese War to the Soviet army’s invasion of Japanese-occupied Northeastern China at the end of World War II. Read More »

Satsuo Yamamoto – Senso to ningen: Unmei no jokyoku AKA Men And War Part I (1970)

Quote:
Yamamoto Satsuo directed this masterful 9 hour epic trilogy on the effects of war on the five generations of a single Japanese family. Based on Gomikawa Jumpei’s (The Human Condition) bestselling novel, the film trilogy skillfully blends newsreel and archive footage with an all-star cast, exotic locations, and beautiful cinematography. The first part follows the rise of the Godai clan rise from war-profiteers to their becoming powerful industrialists in Japanese-occupied Manchuria during the 1930s. The second part follow the the stories of two brothers serving in different units of the Imperial Japanese army from 1935 to 1937 when Japan launched a full scale invasion of China. The third and final part details the family’s trials during the Sino-Japanese War to the Soviet army’s invasion of Japanese-occupied Northeastern China at the end of World War II. Read More »