Tag Archives: 1980s

Dick Fontaine & Pat Hartley – I Heard It Through the Grapevine (1982)

James Baldwin retraces his time in the South during the Civil Rights Movement, reflecting with his trademark brilliance and insight on the passage of more than two decades. From Selma and Birmingham, and Atlanta, to the battleground beaches of St. Augustine, Florida, with Chinua Achebe, and back north for a visit to Newark with Amiri Baraka, Baldwin lays bare the fiction of progress in post–Civil Rights America—wondering “what happened to the children” and those “who did not die, but whose lives were smashed on Freedom Road.” Read More »

Stanislaw Rózewicz – Aniol w szafie AKA Angel in the Wardrobe (1987)

“Angel In The Wardrobe” is a film about responsibility, towards ourselves and others. A film about conscience; about the memory, without which we are nothing. The fears and anxieties in us and around us”.

— Stanislaw Rozewicz. Read More »

Andrzej Wajda – Dyrygent AKA The Conductor (1980)

Quote:
A violinist in a provincial Polish orchestra, whose husband is the director of the ensemble, on a visit to the U.S., ties up with the world-renowned symphony conductor. As it turns out, he was once in love with the violinist’s mother. The conductor, a slightly unstable hypochondriac, returns to Poland to lead the provincial orchestra. He also tries to revive an old love affair using the violinist as a surrogate of her mother. Her husband is resentful of the conductor for personal and professional reasons. Read More »

Med Hondo – Sarraounia (1986)

Sarrouina (Keïta), a young warrior queen of the Azna tribe well-schooled in the arts of herbalism and warfare, leads her people to victory against a neighboring tribe. But the real trial of strength for her comes when the French army marches south to widen its colonial grip on the African continent. The second half of the film focuses on the French, acidly but plausibly satirized as little tyrants whose megalomania swells in proportion with their failure to grasp the realities of the culture they are trying to crush. Grounded in careful historical research, Sarraounia is a superbly crafted and expansive film that strikes a celebratory, assertive tone. Read More »

Richard Loncraine & Dennis Potter – Blade on the Feather (1980)

New York Times:
THE setting is a rather grand English country home on the Isle of Wight. Two women are bickering as they play lawn tennis. An elderly man reading beneath a tree spots a fly on his hand and begins having an odd attack. A young stranger suddenly appears and gives the man mouth-to-mouth resuscitation or, so to speak, a kiss of life. Later, the victim will thank him for having braved not only the garlic on his breath but ”an old man’s slack mouth.” Read More »

Umberto Lenzi – Incontro nell’ultimo paradiso AKA The Daughter of the Jungle (1982)

Two college students decide to take a vacation to the Amazon. After renting a boat and sailing down the river in search of some good scenery, the two kids become lost. Read More »

Gavin Millar & Dennis Potter – Cream in My Coffee (1980)

Cream in My Coffee is a television drama by Dennis Potter, broadcast on ITV on 2 November 1980 as the last in a loosely connected trilogy of plays exploring language and betrayal. A juxtaposition between youth and old age, the play combines a non-linear narrative with the use of popular music to heighten dramatic tension, a feature of much of Potter’s work. Cream in My Coffee was awarded the Prix Italia for best drama in 1981 and Peggy Ashcroft gained a BAFTA Best Actress award in 1981. The play’s title is taken from the popular song “You’re the Cream in My Coffee”, from the 1929 Broadway musical Hold Everything! Read More »