Tag Archives: 1980s

Clark Santee – Graffiti Rock (1984)

Quote:
Graffiti Rock resembled a hip hop version of the popular television dance shows at the time such as Soul Train and American Bandstand. It was created and hosted by Michael Holman, who was the manager of the popular break-dancing crew, the New York City Breakers. It features Run-D.M.C., Shannon, The New York City Breakers DJ Jimmie Jazz, Kool Moe Dee and Special K of the Treacherous Three. The New York City Breakers, who were fresh off of their success from the movie Beat Street, made a showcase appearance. Read More »

Lars von Trier – Epidemic (1987)

Epidemic (1987)

Epidemic arose from a challenge between Lars von Trier and Claes Kastholm of the Danish Film Institute, Trier betting – in order to get funding for another film – that he could make a film for less than one million Danish Kroner (about £100,000). The result is an intriguing film, but not a very good one, showing at least what Trier could do under self-imposed limitations, paving the way for The Kingdom and showing roots that would lead to the Dogme Manifesto. Read More »

Marek Piestrak – Klatwa Doliny Wezy AKA Curse of Snakes Valley (1987)

An ex marine (Traven), a Polish professor (Tarnas) and a French journalist (Christine) are on the hunt for a treasure in this great Polish b-movie flick. Actually most of the contemporary Polish movies suck. But this one sucks so bad, that it’s enjoyable. You’ve got all the possible cliches here, plus cheesy stop-motion special effects, plus cheesy dialogues, plus nice landscapes, plus nice cast with some big names (Roman Wilhelmi, Leon Niemczyk and recently deceased Ewa Salacka). Polish-Soviet production, shot in Viet Nam/Paris. If you wet your pants watching the Nazis in the first Indiana Jones, who melted after opening the Ark, grab this one. Read More »

Shinsuke Ogawa – Nippon-koku Furuyashiki-mura AKA Furuyashiki: A Japanese Village (1984)

Quote:
This is Ogawa Productions’ first major film from their Yamagata period. They had already started photography on Magino Village: A Tale but they were drawn to this village deep in the high country above Magino when a particularly cold bout of weather threatened crops. Inevitably, their attention strayed from the impact of weather and geography on the harvest to the “life history” of Furuyashiki Village. On the one hand, Ogawa returns to his roots by playing with the conventions of the science film. At the same time, he discovers a local, peripheral space in which to think about the nation and the state of village Japan. From this “distant perspective” in the very heart of the Japanese mountains, Ogawa discovers a village still dealing with the trauma of global warfare and struggling for survival as their children flee for the cities. Read More »

Vincent Ward – The Navigator: A Mediaeval Odyssey (1988)

From IMDB:
“A tantalizing meditation on faith, mystery, and imagination.

Sometime in the Middle Ages, a group of men living in fear of the Black Death follow the visions of a nine year-old boy (Hamish MacFarlane) to go on a pilgrimage by digging a tunnel through the center of the earth (!) emerging instead in twentieth century New Zealand (!) where they try to complete their journey by erecting a cross atop a church steeple. A willing suspension of disbelief (or the kind of unquestioning faith that the main characters have) never hurts when watching something like this, but if you’re in the right frame of mind, this fable will gradually draw you into its tantalizing meditation on faith, mystery, and imagination.” Read More »

Emir Kusturica – Sjecas Li Se, Dolly Bell ? aka Do you remember, Dolly Bell ? (1981)

SYNOPSIS: (from the Artificial Eye release)
As Hollywood movies begin to find their way into the country, sixteen year-old Dino becomes seduced by the glamour of the gangster films that flash before his eyes at the local cinema. Determining to follow a life of crime himself, Dino falls in with a band of petty crooks until a liaison with local prostitute Dolly Bell turns his world upside down in a way not even the movies could have prepared him for. Read More »

James Dearden – Pascali’s Island (1988)

Synopsis:
‘Set in 1908 during decline of the Ottoman Empire. A dissatisfied spy for the Sultan, Pascali, offers his services as translator to a visiting archaeologist from Britain. Matters are complicated by the fact that the archaelogist falls in love with Pascali’s friend Lydia.’
– BFI Read More »