Tag Archives: 1980s

Shinsuke Ogawa – Nippon-koku Furuyashiki-mura AKA Furuyashiki: A Japanese Village (1984)

Quote:
This is Ogawa Productions’ first major film from their Yamagata period. They had already started photography on Magino Village: A Tale but they were drawn to this village deep in the high country above Magino when a particularly cold bout of weather threatened crops. Inevitably, their attention strayed from the impact of weather and geography on the harvest to the “life history” of Furuyashiki Village. On the one hand, Ogawa returns to his roots by playing with the conventions of the science film. At the same time, he discovers a local, peripheral space in which to think about the nation and the state of village Japan. From this “distant perspective” in the very heart of the Japanese mountains, Ogawa discovers a village still dealing with the trauma of global warfare and struggling for survival as their children flee for the cities. Read More »

Vincent Ward – The Navigator: A Mediaeval Odyssey (1988)

From IMDB:
“A tantalizing meditation on faith, mystery, and imagination.

Sometime in the Middle Ages, a group of men living in fear of the Black Death follow the visions of a nine year-old boy (Hamish MacFarlane) to go on a pilgrimage by digging a tunnel through the center of the earth (!) emerging instead in twentieth century New Zealand (!) where they try to complete their journey by erecting a cross atop a church steeple. A willing suspension of disbelief (or the kind of unquestioning faith that the main characters have) never hurts when watching something like this, but if you’re in the right frame of mind, this fable will gradually draw you into its tantalizing meditation on faith, mystery, and imagination.” Read More »

Emir Kusturica – Sjecas Li Se, Dolly Bell ? aka Do you remember, Dolly Bell ? (1981)

SYNOPSIS: (from the Artificial Eye release)
As Hollywood movies begin to find their way into the country, sixteen year-old Dino becomes seduced by the glamour of the gangster films that flash before his eyes at the local cinema. Determining to follow a life of crime himself, Dino falls in with a band of petty crooks until a liaison with local prostitute Dolly Bell turns his world upside down in a way not even the movies could have prepared him for. Read More »

James Dearden – Pascali’s Island (1988)

Synopsis:
‘Set in 1908 during decline of the Ottoman Empire. A dissatisfied spy for the Sultan, Pascali, offers his services as translator to a visiting archaeologist from Britain. Matters are complicated by the fact that the archaelogist falls in love with Pascali’s friend Lydia.’
– BFI Read More »

Kira Muratova – Peremena uchasti AKA Change of Fortune (1987)

Quote:
A lawyer is preparing to defend a rich, respected man’s wife, who killed a friend of the family who was attempting to sexually assault her. The scenario changes abruptly for all involved when the lawyer discovers a love letter from the woman to the murdered man. Read More »

Jon Jost – Slow Moves (1983)

Slow Moves is a bluesy lyrical romance of two ugly-ducklings who meet on the Golden Gate Bridge and after a brief and awkward courtship, live together with the usual problems of money and work, take flight to an illusory freedom on the road, and dances inexorably to a drab doom. At once funny, grubby, beautiful, lyrical, tragic and sad. (Jon Jost) Read More »

Youssef Chahine – Adieu Bonaparte AKA Farewell Bonaparte (1985)

Quote:
In 1798, Napoleon lands his army in Egypt, defeats the Mameluke warlords (the remnants of Ottoman rule), and goes on to Cairo. Three brothers, who are Egyptian patriots, chafe under Mameluke rule and reject the prospect of French domination. Bakr, the eldest, is a hothead, quick to advocate armed rebellion; Ali is more philosophical and poetic; Yehia is young and impressionable. One of Napoleon’s generals, the one-legged intellectual Caffarelli, wants to make Frenchmen out of Ali, Yehia, and other Egyptians, opening a bakery where their father works, becoming a tutor, and declaring his love for them. Is tragedy the only resolution of these conflicting loyalties? Read More »