Tag Archives: Anthony Asquith

Anthony Asquith – Cottage to Let AKA Bombsight Stolen (1941) (HD)

Plot:
Upper class Mrs. Barrington (Jeanne de Casalis) takes in two child evacuees from London, including cocky teenager Ronald (George Cole), lodging them in a cottage she owns. However, it has already been let to annoyingly inquisitive Charles Dimble (Alastair Sim). To compound the confusion, Mrs. Barrington had also agreed to allow it to be converted into a military hospital. Spitfire pilot Flight Lieutenant Perry (John Mills) parachutes into the nearby loch and becomes the first patient, tended by Mrs. Barrington’s pretty daughter Helen (Carla Lehmann). Mrs. Barrington moves Ronald to the main house, while Dimble and Perry remain in the cottage. Read More »

Anthony Asquith – The Woman in Question AKA Five Angles on Murder (1950)

Synopsis:
When a fairground fortune-teller, Agnes (Jean Kent), is found strangled in her apartment, the police interview the people around her, but quickly establish that everyone saw the murdered woman in a different way. … Only when the police discover the true nature of the murdered woman, and the motive for her murder, will they be able to unmask the killer? Read More »

Anthony Asquith – The Millionairess (1960)

London-based Millionairess Epifania (Sophia Loren) is attracted to Dr. Kabir (MD from Delhi and PhD from Calcutta), who is more intent on treating patients. When she persists, he confides in her that he had made a commitment to his late widowed seamstress mother that he will wed any woman who will manage to survive on just Rs.500/-, for 90 days. She finds out that this sum is equivalent to just 35 shillings but readily accepts this challenge. She also informs him that her late father had also imposed a condition that she must wed a male who will turn £500 into £15000 within the same period. Epifania then finds employment with an Italian firm, ends up re-organizing, and turning up the firm’s profits. At the end of 90 days, she goes to meet Kabir and discovers that he has not only given all the money away but also has no interest whatsoever in marrying her. Read More »

Anthony Asquith & A.V. Bramble – Shooting Stars (1927)

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Quote:
Before the constipated bloat and stagger of his 40s and 50s theatrical adaptations, Anthony Asquith was a lively and original maker of silent films. A Cottage on Dartmoor is already celebrated as a rare example of expressionist gloom and experimentation taking root in British soil. Underground has just been restored by the BFI, and it is to be hoped that this dazzling work will be next. Read More »