Tag Archives: Barbara Hershey

Peter Tscherkassky – Outer Space (1999)

A premonition of a horror film, lurking danger: A house – at night, slightly tilted in the camera’s view, eerily lit – surfaces from the pitch black, then sinks back into it again. A young woman begins to move slowly towards the building. She enters it. The film cuts crackle, the sound track grates, suppressed, smothered. Found footage from Hollywood forms the basis for the film. The figure who creeps through the images, who is thrown around by them and who attacks them is Barbara Hershey. Tscherkassky’s dramatic frame by frame re-cycling, re-copying and new exposure of the material, folds the images and the rooms into each other. Read More »

Sidney J. Furie – The Entity (1982) (DVD)


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This big budget entry from the early ’80s horror boom is one of the most underrated of that genre. The Entity succeeds despite potentially exploitative subject matter because it tells its story in a serious, respectful style. Frank de Felitta’s script devotes as much time to building three-dimensional characters and detailing the inner workings of psychology and parapsychology as it does creating shocks. As a result, the horrific parts of the tale are more effective because they are couched in a compelling reality. That said, The Entity never feels like anything less than a horror movie, thanks to forceful direction by Sidney J. Furie, who uses moody cinematography from Stephen Burum and an obsessive, minimalist score by Charles Bernstein to create an edgy, off-kilter atmosphere guaranteed to keep the audience tense between the set pieces. Read More »

James Bridges – The Baby Maker (1970)


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First time writer-director James Bridges shows a pitch-perfect ear and an observant, affectionate eye in this beguiling time capsule of clashing cultures and values during the Age of Aquarius. The film is also a showcase for its luminous leading lady, the ne plus ultra of hippie goddesses, Barbara Hershey “Seagull”.

From the IMDB:
“An upper-class, childless couple in Southern California ‘hires’ a comely hippie to bear the husband’s baby (this being 1970, she conceives the old-fashioned way); soon, the straight-laced twosome are drawn into the young woman’s world. Interesting, insightful, provocative (for its time), the movie does follow a typical by-the-numbers pattern (with an ‘open minded’ boyfriend, jealousies and friction on all sides), but writer-director James Bridges is very tasteful and unhurried. He also gets some lovely shots of Barbara Hershey at her chestnut-haired, go-go-booted best (my favorites were her run across the street at the beginning, a stunning glimpse of her through a rain-soaked car window, and under the sheets in bed). The incredible finale refuses to compromise, and even though the medical aspects of the story are dated, the emotions are still on-target.” Read More »