Tag Archives: Brian Aherne

Cornel Wilde – Lancelot and Guinevere AKA Sword of Lancelot (1963)

“Lancelot and Guinevere” (known as “Sword of Lancelot” in the U.S.) is a British 1963 film starring Cornel Wilde and his real-life wife at the time, Jean Wallace. This lesser-known version of the Camelot legend, is a work almost solely made by Cornel Wilde, who co-produced, directed, co-wrote, and played Lancelot.

Lancelot is King Arthur’s most valued Knight of the Round Table and a paragon of courage and virtue. Things change, however, when he falls for Guinevere (Wallace), bride of Arthur (Brian Aherne, who had essayed this character more than once, e.g. in 1954’s “Prince Valiant”), and she for him. Read More »

John Brahm – The Locket (1946)

Synopsis:
Lovely Nancy seems like the ideal bride to fiancée John Willis… until, just before the ceremony, Willis is approached by Harry Blair, claiming to be Nancy’s former husband. The tale Blair unfolds (in a flashback within a flashback within a flashback!) paints Nancy as a kleptomaniac, habitual liar, and perhaps worse. But is Blair telling the truth? And does fate have another surprise in store? Read More »

Basil Dean – The Constant Nymph (1933)

A married man leaves his wife for a teenage girl.

The Constant Nymph is a 1933 British drama film directed by Basil Dean and Victoria Hopper, Brian Aherne and Leonora Corbett. It is an adaptation of the novel The Constant Nymph by Margaret Kennedy. Dean tried to persuade Novello to reprise his appearance from the 1928 silent version The Constant Nymph but was turned down and cast Aherne in the part instead. Read More »

Anthony Asquith & A.V. Bramble – Shooting Stars (1927)

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Quote:
Before the constipated bloat and stagger of his 40s and 50s theatrical adaptations, Anthony Asquith was a lively and original maker of silent films. A Cottage on Dartmoor is already celebrated as a rare example of expressionist gloom and experimentation taking root in British soil. Underground has just been restored by the BFI, and it is to be hoped that this dazzling work will be next. Read More »

Basil Dean – The Constant Nymph (1933)

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A married man leaves his wife for a teenage girl.

The Constant Nymph is a 1933 British drama film directed by Basil Dean and Victoria Hopper, Brian Aherne and Leonora Corbett. It is an adaptation of the novel The Constant Nymph by Margaret Kennedy. Dean tried to persuade Novello to reprise his appearance from the 1928 silent version The Constant Nymph but was turned down and cast Aherne in the part instead.
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W.S. Van Dyke – I Live My Life (1935)

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Reviewed by Dennis Schwartz

A brisk romantic/comedy Joan Crawford vehicle capably directed by W.S. Van Dyke and gamely written but not one of the better scripts by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. It’s from the short story “Claustrophobia” by A. Carter Goodloe. It’s the usual class warfare Joan Crawford film of that era with the good looking actress dressed chic and defending her free-spirited upper-class superficial lifestyle in her argumentative romance with the commoner Brian Aherne, who thinks the high society crowd are idlers and lightweights.

Bored heiress Kay Bentley (Joan Crawford) travelling with her dad (Frank Morgan) on his yacht meets on the Greek island of Naxos handsome Irish archaeologist Terry O’Neill (Brian Aherne), who’s on an archaeological dig for the Pygmalion statue. Learning that he thinks very little of the society jet set Kay tells Terry she’s Ann Morrison, the secretary of Mr. Bentley. They kiss and he falls madly in love, surpisingly following the attractive secretary to New York where he hopes to marry her. Learning the truth, the two have a spat but nevertheless grow fonder of each other. Read More »