Tag Archives: Bruce La Bruce

Bruce LaBruce – No Skin Off My Ass (1991)

Quote:
A lonely hairdresser watches the title sequence of “That Cold Day in the Park” then visits a local park to invite a down-and-out skinhead to his apartment. He draws the silent man a bath and talks to him as he soaks. He locks his guest in a bedroom. Next day, the skinhead leaves through the window and visits his sister, who’s making a film called “Sisters of the SLA.” He helps with a screen-test. The hairdresser has dreams and fantasies involving the skinhead, the skinhead returns to visit him, and then the filmmaker pays a call on the two men, exposing her brother as faking his silence and pretending a lack of sexual interest. Fantasies can come true. Read More »

Alan Zweig – I, Curmudgeon (2004)

In this often very funny enquiry into crankiness, Toronto filmmaker Alan Zweig interviews notable curmudgeons like Fran Lebowitz, Harvey Pekar and Bruce LaBruce. Zweig wants to know what their frickin’ problem is and, more importantly, whether it’s the same as his. As in Vinyl, his equally irascible doc on record collectors, the endearingly dour filmmaker spends much of I, Curmudgeon spilling his guts directly to his camera and torturing himself with big questions that he can never answer satisfactorily. Zweig then confronts his subjects with the same questions, thereby making them even grouchier. (How grouchy? Andy Rooney is moved to kick Zweig out of his office.) Though I, Curmudgeon’s meandering structure and incessant jump-cuts are irritants, they’re also appropriate to the movie’s abrasive, anti-social personality. Consider this a testament to the power of negative thinking. – Eye Weekly Read More »

Bruce La Bruce – Ulrike’s Brain (2017)

Doctor Julia Pfeiffer has the brain of the radical leftwing activist Ulrike Meinhof stored away in a box. Her rival, the extreme rightwing ideologist Detlev Schlesinger, is in possession of the remains of Michael Kühnen, a neo-Nazi gay who died of AIDS. What will happen when these characters meet? A little big provocation directed by the inimitable Bruce LaBruce. Read More »