Tag Archives: Catherine Spaak

Marco Ferreri – Break up AKA The Man with the Balloons (Uncut) (1965)

Synopsis :
An industry that manufactures chocolates, is obsessed to the limit, to scientifically verify the exact spot where the balloons burst when they swell, but fails in its attempts, because they always end up breaking balloons, putting nerves increasingly enervated and reaching complete neurosis, while his great woman, just married, waiting on the bed, something more to him than his passion for inflating balloons. Read More »

Renato Castellani & Luigi Comencini & Franco Rossi – 3 notti d’amore AKA Three Nights of Love (1964)

Omnibus film with individual segments directed by Renato Castellani, Luigi Comencini and Franco Rossi; all of them starring the radiant Catherine Spaak as “out of place” women, longing for love, in a Sicillian village, a monastery, and a modern Italian urban setting, respectively. Read More »

Antonio Pietrangeli – La Parmigiana AKA The Girl from Parma [+Extras] (1963)

Synopsis
Forced to leave her village because of a scandalous love affair with a seminarian, Dora looks for work and refuge in Parma, where she becomes involved with a petty criminal. Another of Pietrangeli’s bitter comedies of deracination, reflecting the sudden urbanization of Italy during the industrial boom years of the 1950s and 1960s. Read More »

Dario Argento – Il gatto a nove code AKA The Cat o’ Nine Tails AKA Cat o’ Nine Tails (1971)

Synopsis:
Franco Arno is a blind man that lives with his young niece and makes a living writing crossword puzzles. One night, while walking on the street, he overhears a weird conversation between two man sitting in a car parked in front of a medical institute where genetic experiments are performed. The same night someone breaks in the institute and knocks out a guard. Arno decides to investigate with the help of reporter Carlo Giordani. Read More »

François Villiers – Le puits aux trois vérités AKA Three Faces of Sin (1961)

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Synopsis
Midnight in Paris, Faubourg St Honoré. In one house, a woman suddenly screams and the sound of a gunshot is heard. A short time later, Laurent Lénaud, a young painter, is running away with a suitcase. Arriving at a hotel, he enters a room where a young woman named Rossana is crying. The room is strewn with broken furniture and clothes lie on the floor. Laurent is almost certain that his wife Danielle is to blame for this. Meanwhile, in an expensive apartment a woman is responding to the questions put to her by police officer Bertrand. She is Renée Plèges, the owner of an antiques shop. That evening, she found her daughter Danielle shot dead. Renée explains that Laurent, her son-in-law, wanted to leave Danielle. When she refused to divorce him, he killed her. While Bertrand asks Renée to tell him everything she remembers since the first day she met Laurent, the latter recounts to his mistress Rossana the events that took place before Danielle’s death. Two completely different stories emerge. Then Danielle’s personal diary is found, bringing a third explanation of what took place that evening… Read More »

Steno – Febbre da cavallo (1976)

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Imdb User Reviews

thanks tv!
13 June 2003 | by Mario Pio (Venezia, Italy)

When in the 1976 “Febbre da cavallo” exit in cinema not so much people went to see it. The status of “cult” movie starts from the various nocturnal passages in the private tv, during the ’80. That’s why people loves “Febbre” in this way (a little bit exaggerated). It’s a personal people discover. This is not the “pinnacle” of italian comedy. It’s only a little movie but funny and memorable in some of its parts. There is one thing over others: the actors are really good, better then some late italian comedies, in a time when comedy leaves for sexy italian comedy, the “commediaccia”. So, no Alberto Sordi, not Tognazzi but Gigi Proietti (an excellent, hystrionic theathre actor), and Enrico Montesano, in one of his few good performance on cinema. Enjoy this movie and…”vai cor tango!” Read More »