Tag Archives: Dean Martin

Lewis Milestone – Ocean’s Eleven (1960)

Synopsis:
A band of soldier friends from the 82nd airborne regroup 15 years later to rob millions of dollars from five Las Vegas casinos. When one of the eleven’s future step-father learns who pulled the job, the crew must find a way to smuggle the loot out of town before their payoff is cut in half. Read More »

Howard Hawks – Rio Bravo (1959)

Synopsis:
Sheriff John T. Chance has his hands full after arresting Joe Burdette for murder. He knows that Burdette’s brother Nathan, a powerful rancher, will go to any lengths to get him out of jail. Chance’s good friend Pat Wheeler offers to help but within 20 minutes of making the offer is gunned down in the street, shot in the back. That leaves his elderly deputy Stumpy, the town drunk Dude – once a deputy and a pretty good shot when he was sober – and a young hand, Colorado, who used to work for Wheeler. Nathan Burdette meanwhile has a couple of dozen men at his disposal. Chance does his best to prepare all the while romancing a pretty gambler who goes by the name of Feathers. Read More »

Hal Walker – At War with the Army (1950)

Set on an Army base during World War II, Pfc. Alvin Korwin (Lewis) and 1st Sgt. Vic Puccinelli (Martin) were friends before the war and had a nightclub act. Private Korwin wants to go home to see his newly born baby and Sgt. Puccinelli wants to be transferred overseas. Confusion ensues when a pregnant old girlfriend arrives to visit Sgt. Vic Puccinelli Read More »

Vincente Minnelli – Bells Are Ringing [+Extras] (1960)

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Judy Holliday’s final film, Bells Are Ringing, is a tailor-made vehicle
for her brassy talent. She’d won a Tony for the Broadway version of
the show, playing an overly sympathetic telephone receptionist who
gets involved in her customers’ lives. Betty Comden and Adolph Green
adapted their stage musical. Director Vincente Minnelli seems content
to showcase Holliday’s crack comic timing. Despite the somewhat muted
tone, there are delightful bits: a typical Comden & Green showbiz party
(with a number about name-dropping), Frank Gorshin’s send-up of a
Brando-inflected actor, and Dean Martin’s crooning. “The Party’s Over,”
that unforgettable end-of-the-evening lament, and “Just in Time” are
the Jule Styne standards from the score – – – Amazon.com Read More »