Tag Archives: Dominique Sanda

Maximilian Schell – Erste Liebe (1970)

Based on Ivan Turgeyev’s novella, Erste Liebe is about two young lovers in czarist Russia. One is a 21-year-old woman, the other a young man of sixteen. Things take a tragic turn as the girl (Dominique Sanda as Sanaida) falls in love with the boy’s father (Maximilian Schell). This film was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film in 1970’s Academy Awards. Written
by Reece Lloyd Read More »

Jurriën Rood & Leo de Boer – De Weg naar Bresson aka The Road to Bresson (1984)

SYNOPSIS
The film style of Robert Bresson is the subject of this documentary tribute to the French director and screenwriter, and to his minimalist auteur films about sensitive individuals (or even animals) trying unsuccessfully to survive in a cruel world. Weg Naar Bresson is divided into several segments with specific themes, such as “camera” or “theory,” that are illustrated by film clips, and interviews with Bresson himself (a coup), and also with acclaimed directors Andrei Tarkovsky, Louis Malle, and Paul Schrader (who also wrote a book on three directors, including Bresson).

– Eleanor Mannikka, All Movie Guide Read More »

Edgardo Cozarinsky – Guerriers et captives AKA Guerreros y cautivas (1990)

In 1880, a colonel and his French wife live in a fort in the Patagonian desert. The colonel takes an Amerindian as captive, with the intent to civilize her. A “southern” movie (in opposition to “western”, as it was shot in the deep Argentinean south

Quote:
Dos caras de una misma moneda. Uno viene de lo salvaje hacia la civilización; la otra, desde la civilización hacia la barbarie. Se realiza un cambio de identidad. El guerrero queda impresionado con la civilización romana, y siente que pertenece a aquella. La abuela de Borges quiere rescatar a la india, pero ella la rechaza. Se espanta, no puede creerlo; pero cuando su marido muere, ella se siente identificada. Cuando la india toma la sangre caliente del caballo que acababa de degollar, es cuando termina de demostrar que nunca dejará de ser india, más allá de su lugar de nacimiento. Read More »

Alexandre Astruc – Albert Savarus (1993)


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Based on the 1836 novel by Balzac (wiki)

Quote:
Script-writers who adapt Balzac or Dostoievsky excuse the idiotic transformations they impose on the works from which they construct their scenarios by pleading that the cinema is incapable of rendering every psychological or metaphysical overtone. In their hands, Balzac becomes a collection of engravings in which fashion has the most important place, and Dostoievsky suddenly begins to resemble the novels of Joseph Kessel, with Russian-style drinking-bouts in night-clubs and troika races in the snow. Well, the only cause of these compressions is laziness and lack of imagination. The cinema of today is capable of expressing any kind of reality. What interests us is the creation of this new language. (…) The fundamental problem of the cinema is how to express thought.
Alexandre Astruc, The Birth of a New Avant-Barde: La Camera-Stylo (1948) Read More »

Bernardo Bertolucci – Novecento aka 1900 [Extras] (1976)

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Synopsis

Quote:
Bernardo Bertolucci’s vast historical melodrama used the massive popular, critical, and financial success of its predecessor, the scandalous LAST TANGO IN PARIS, to mount a production of epic scale. Cut down to four hours for its American release, the film utilizes an all-star Hollywood…
Bernardo Bertolucci’s vast historical melodrama used the massive popular, critical, and financial success of its predecessor, the scandalous LAST TANGO IN PARIS, to mount a production of epic scale. Cut down to four hours for its American release, the film utilizes an all-star Hollywood cast to tell its heavily Marxist tale of Italian peasants during the twentieth century. Two boys born on the same day are destined for divergent paths; Olmo (played by Gerard Depardeiu as an adult) is born to peasant parents and will become a passionate socialist, while Alfredo’s (Robert De Niro as an adult) bourgeois, landowning origins will lead him to ultimately embrace fascism. Driven by a sincere hope for and belief in political change, Bertolucci’s film is nonetheless made up of very humane individual stories; it concentrates on highly personal experiences of a politically-charged time, which color the little dramas of love, sex, family, and community. It is at once an epic poem and a political manifesto, and it is the product of a director who was unabashedly communist in his youth, contrasting markedly with later works like 2003’s THE DREAMERS. Read More »