Tag Archives: English

Stephen Frears – Prick Up Your Ears (1987)

Quote:
“Prick Up Your Ears” is the story of Orton and Halliwell and the murder. They say that most murderers are known to their victims. They don’t say that if you knew the victims as well as the murderer did, you might understand more about the murder, but doubtless that is sometimes the case. This movie opens with a brutal, senseless crime. By the time the movie is over, the crime is still brutal, but it is possible to comprehend. Read More »

Leo McCarey – Duck Soup [+commentary] (1933)

Quote:
The small state of Freedonia is in a financial mess, borrowing a huge sum of cash from wealthy widow Mrs. Teasdale. She insists on replacing the current president with crazy Rufus T. Firefly and mayhem erupts. To make matters worse, the neighboring state sends inept spies Chicolini and Pinky to obtain top secret information, creating even more chaos. Read More »

Michael McCarthy – Mystery Junction (1951)

Synopsis:
Larry Gordon, well-known crime writer, is on a train journey when a scream is heard. Upon investigation, the guard had been mugged and a man murdered. Another man is arrested but the full story is yet to be discovered. Read More »

Walt Disney – Walt Disney on the Front Lines – Walt Disney Treasures [+Extras] (1941-1945)

Quote:
The soldiers, the conflicts, and the unimaginable horrors of war will never stop making compelling subjects for dramatic interpretation. But what of the effect the war had here at home? For insight into that part of the story, you have to look at material from the era. For my money, nothing has conveyed the complete and total disruption of everyday life here in the States quite as well as Walt Disney on the Front Lines, one of the most recent and, so far, the best entry in the ambitious Walt Disney Treasures line. Read More »

John Huston – Under the Volcano (1984)

Quote:
Against a background of war breaking out in Europe and the Mexican fiesta Day of Death, we are taken through one day in the life of Geoffrey Firmin, a British consul living in alcoholic disrepair and obscurity in a small southern Mexican town in 1939. The Consul’s self-destructive behaviour, perhaps a metaphor for a menaced civilization, is a source of perplexity and sadness to his nomadic, idealistic half-brother, Hugh, and his ex-wife, Yvonne, who has returned with hopes of healing Geoffrey and their broken marriage. Read More »

Paul Mariano & Kurt Norton – These Amazing Shadows [+Extras] (2011)

What do the films Casablanca, Blazing Saddles, and West Side Story have in common? Besides being popular, they have also been deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant,” by the Library of Congress and listed on the National Film Registry, a roll call of American cinema treasures.

For more than two decades, since the passage of the National Film Preservation Act of 1988, the Librarian of Congress [sic]–with input from the public and advice from the National Film Preservation Board–has selected 25 films every year to add to the Registry. The current list of 550 films includes selections from every genre: documentaries, home movies, Hollywood classics, avant-garde, newsreels, and silent films; and these movies tell us much about ourselves and the American experience–shining light on not just what we did, but what we thought, what we felt, what we imagined, what we aspired to…and the lies we told ourselves. Read More »

Jeff Feuerzeig – The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2005)

Quote:
Daniel Johnston, manic-depressive genius singer/songwriter/artist is revealed in this portrait of madness, creativity and love. The Devil and Daniel Johnston is a 2005 documentary film about the noted American musician Daniel Johnston. It chronicles Johnston’s life from childhood up to the present, with an emphasis on his experiences with bipolar disorder, and how it manifested itself in demonic self-obsession. Read More »