Tag Archives: English

John Ford – The Long Voyage Home (1940)

Shannon Kelley writes:
The powers and fascinations of director John Ford and playwright Eugene O’Neill are happily met in this 1940 feature dramatizing the lives of men who serve as crew members aboard commercial freighters. Like O’Neill, Ford nursed a lifelong obsession with sailing and the sea, and had spent his early years in Portland, Maine, amid the maritime culture that this picture describes. Adapted and updated by screenwriter Dudley Nichols (Ford’s frequent collaborator) from four of O’Neill’s early plays set aboard the fictional “SS Glencairn,” the film recounts the experiences of the ship’s crew while transporting ammunition from the West Indies to England during World War II. Read More »

Richard Quine – Full of Life (1956)

Museum of Modern Art writes:
In a gender twist on the “meddling mother-in-law,” Nick Rocco’s old-world father, Vittorio Rocco (Salvatore Baccaloni), can’t help insinuating himself into his son and daughter-in-law’s lives. Nick and Emily are just a few days away from the birth of their first child and Vittorio—a skilled handyman—is called in to help with repairs in their new home. Nick is reluctant to rely upon his meddling dad, but the repairs have to be made before the baby comes home. Baccaloni was an opera singer and member of the La Scala Opera in Milan. Read More »

Ross McElwee – Sherman’s March [+Extras] (1986)

Filmmaker Ross McElwee grew up in the South and always marveled at how the folks there were affected by Union general William Tecumseh Sherman’s legacy. Aiming to delve deeper into the region’s interest, McElwee revisits the path of the general’s march that took down the Confederacy. But the tone of his documentary changes when he learns his girlfriend has left him, causing him to second-guess himself with each woman he meets during the shoot. Read More »

Lindsay Anderson – O Lucky Man! [+Extras] (1973)

One man’s dreams of success take him on a Byzantine journey through the various stations of the British class system in this politically charged black comedy from director Lindsay Anderson. Mick Travis (Malcolm McDowell) is an ambitious young man who is looking to get his foot on the first rung of the ladder of success by landing a job as a salesman. After the death of Imperial Coffee’s leading drummer in the North, Travis’ charm and enthusiasm so impresses manager Mr. Duff (Arthur Lowe) that he’s given the job, and after some coaching from Gloria Rowe (Rachel Roberts), Travis sets out to find his fortune in the coffee trade. Read More »

Edward Dmytryk – The Sniper (1952)

Synopsis:
Apparently rejected by women all his life, a loner with a high-power rifle starts on a trail of murder. The police are baffled by the apparently random killings until their psychologist comes up with some ideas. Read More »

Andrew Kotting – This Filthy Earth (2001)

From The Guardian
Filthy is right. This is a film to counter-balance any lingering misapprehension that the countryside is a place of picturesque tranquillity – and, thank heavens, it is not your everyday Britpic. Andrew Kötting’s second feature, adapted from Zola, is a gallery of bucolic grotesques set in a remote rural community in the early 20th century, long before EU subsidies, mad cows and agribusiness (but not before foot and mouth). The screenplay was written by Kötting and comic Sean Lock. Read More »

Les Blank – Gap-Toothed Women (1987)

Quote:
A charming valentine to women born with a space between their teeth, ranging from lighthearted whimsy to a deeper look at issues like self-esteem and societal attitudes toward standards of beauty. Interviews were conducted with over one hundred women, including model Lauren Hutton and Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. Read More »