Tag Archives: French

Marcel Hanoun – Octobre à Madrid (1967

“OCTOBRE A MADRID” 1964, 70 min, 16 mm

Octobre à Madrid, de Marcel Hanoun (1964), est certainement le film qui m’a le plus hanté et nourri depuis près de quarante ans. Je l’ai vu, pour la première fois, un matin de l’année 1946 au cinéma Quartier Latin. Ces séances pour lève-tôt étaient destinées à faire connaitre des films “difficiles” ou fragiles. J’y avais également découvert, dans ce même cadre, Méditerranée de Jean-Daniel Pollet. Read More »

Stéphane Lafleur – En terrains connus AKA Familiar Ground (2011)

Benoit and Maryse: a brother and sister with seemingly normal lives. Everything is changed by a series of coincidences… and the arrival of a man claiming to come from the future. Read More »

Claudine Nougaret – Paul Lacombe (1986)

In 1986 Paul Lacombe live out one’s remaining days in Sainte-Eulalie-de-Cernon, Aveyron. During 3 last years he wrote his memoirs. Claudine Nougaret films the meeting with her grandfather. Read More »

Fyodor Otsep – Mirages de Paris (1933)

A jolly French film, with a rich vein of satire, is at the little Acme Theatre on Union Square under the name of “Mirages de Paris.”

In this fast-moving fantasy of the unsophisticated student (Mlle. Francell) who escapes from a boarding school to become, after many trials and tribulations, the “toast of Paris,” Fedor Ozep has managed to combine much of the technic of his native Russia with the flair for the ridiculous supposed to belong to all true Parisians. Read More »

Julien Duvivier – Panique AKA Panic [2018 Restoration + Extras] (1946)

Criterion wrote:
Proud, eccentric, and antisocial, Monsieur Hire (Michel Simon) has always kept to himself. But after a woman turns up dead in the Paris suburb where he lives, he feels drawn to a pretty young newcomer to town (Viviane Romance), discovers that his neighbors are only too ready to suspect the worst of him, and is framed for the murder. Based on a novel by Georges Simenon, Julien Duvivier’s first film after his return to France from Hollywood finds the acclaimed poetic realist applying his consummate craft to darker, moodier ends. Propelled by its two deeply nuanced lead performances, the tensely noirish Panique exposes the dangers of the knives-out mob mentality, delivering as well a pointed allegory for the behavior of Duvivier’s countrymen during the war. Read More »

Agnès Varda – Le bonheur AKA Happiness (1965)

Quote:

Even with the landscape bathed in warm hues and verdant fields on a summer day, accompanied by the lushness of a textured Mozart adagio, clad with airy wispiness of draped muslin, and emphatically punctuated by a picture-perfect sunflower in full bloom that suggests an aesthetic symbiosis with the vibrant, saccharine images of husband and fellow filmmaker Jacques Demy’s contemporary film The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, the association of Le Bonheur as both a prefiguration and corollary to the somber and oppressive bleakness of Vagabond – a film Agnès Varda would make twenty years later – nevertheless, seems inescapable. Ostensibly a chronicle of the repercussions of a husband’s admitted infidelity on his family (an affair that, as François (Jean-Claude Drouot) rationalizes, was borne not of an emotional void, but of an abundance of happiness and desire to extend that sense of personal joy beyond the sphere of their marital relationship), the film is also an incisive satire on egoism, patriarchal immunity, and bourgeois complacency that implicitly tolerates acts of infidelity and emotional irresponsibility. Read More »

Frederico Lobo & Pedro Pinho – Bab Sebta AKA The Door of Ceuta (2008)

Quote:
Bab Sebta means The door of Ceuta in Arabic, the name of one of the two Spanish enclaves situated in the North of Morocco. It is in the direction of this name, at this doorway, that most of the emigrants from the African continent who want to reach Europe converge. Read More »