Tag Archives: Ingmar Bergman

Ingmar Bergman – Rabies (1958)

“This made-for-television film was based on Olle Hedberg’s script, which Ingmar Bergman had directed for the City Theatre of Hälsingborg as early as in 1945, and as a radio play the following year. Bergman, who called the play ‘an unpleasant piece’, used stage actors from Malmö. The scarce reviews of the film focused on Bergman’s faiblesse for the puppet theatre and the morality play, with the result that the characters functioned as types.” Read More »

Ingmar Bergman – Backanterna aka Bacchae (1993)

Bergman’s staging of an opera based on the last great play of the Greek dramatist, Euripides.

Quote:
This was a TV version of the staged opera from 1991, a transposition of Euripides’s classical drama written for an amphitheatre into a performance designed for the most intimate of stages, the TV screen. ‘The whole production was suffused with the total professional knowledge of a master from the first image to the last. A Greek TV drama of world class’ [Hela uppsättningen genomströmmades från första bilden till den sista av den totala yrkeskunskapen hos en mästare. Read More »

Ingmar Bergman – Såsom i en Spegel AKA Through a Glass Darkly (1961) (HD)

A young woman, Karin, has recently returned to the family island after spending some time in a mental hospital. On the island with her is her lonely brother and kind, but increasingly desperate husband (Max von Sydow). They are joined by Karin’s father (Gunnar Björnstrand), who is a world-traveling author that is estranged to his children. The film depicts how Karin’s grip on reality slowly slips away and how the bonds between the family members are changing in light of this fact. Read More »

Dheeraj Akolkar – Liv & Ingmar (2012)

Synopsis
This feature documentary is an affectionate yet truthful account of the 42 years and 12 films long relationship between legendary actress Liv Ullmann and master film maker Ingmar Bergman.

Told entirely from Liv’s point of view, this rollercoaster journey of extreme highs and lows is constructed as a collage of images and sounds from the timeless Ullmann-Bergman films, behind the scenes footage, still photographs, passages from Liv’s book ‘Changing’ and Ingmar’s love letters to Liv. Read More »

Ingmar Bergman – Hamnstad AKA Port of Call (1948)

Quote:
Strongly influenced by the neorealist films of Roberto Rossellini, Port of Call is Ingmar Bergman’s most naturalistic work. Shot on location in the port of Göteborg by Gunnar Fischer (who would become one of the director’s key collaborators), the film focuses on the tentative relationship between Gösta (Bengt Eklund), a sincere, easygoing seaman, and Berit (NineChristine Jönsson), a suicidal young woman from a broken home. As Berit reveals more about her troubled past, and the couple confront many harsh realities in the present, a meaningful bond begins to form between them. With this confident and disciplined feature, his fifth, Bergman tackled moral and social issues head-on. Read More »

Ingmar Bergman – Larmar och gör sig till AKA In the Presence of a Clown (1997)

“In the Presence of a Clown (Swedish: Larmar och gör sig till) is a television film by Ingmar Bergman, recorded for Swedish television in 1997 with Bergman as a director. It was screened in the Un Certain Regard section of the 1998 Cannes Film Festival. It tells the story of a professor named Carl, who has been found guilty of attempted murder and sentenced to treatment in a mental ward. In the hospital he befriends a man named Osvald, and they attempt to make and promote a film.

The film was produced for Sveriges Television from Bergman’s 1994 play of the same title. ” Read More »

Ingmar Bergman – Kvinnors väntan AKA Waiting Women (1952)



While at a summerhouse, awaiting their husbands’ return, a group of sisters-in-law recount stories from their respective marriages. Rakel (Anita Björk) tells of receiving a visit from a former lover (Jarl Kulle); Marta (Maj-Britt Nilsson) of agreeing to marry a painter (Birger Malmsten) only after having his child; and Karin (Eva Dahlbeck) of being stuck with her husband (Gunnar Björnstrand) in an elevator, where they talk intimately for the first time in years. Making dexterous use of flashbacks, the engaging Waiting Women is a veritable seedbed of Bergman themes, ranging from aspiring young love to the fear of loneliness, with the finale a masterpiece of chamber comedy. Read More »