Tag Archives: Italian

Roberto Rossellini – Atti degli apostoli aka Acts of the Apostles (1969)

from the imdb comments:

The second in a series of historical films begun by Roberto Rossellini in the late 1960’s was this sublime movie for Italian television which traces the spread of Christianity in the thirty years after the death and resurrection of Jesus, according to the accounts of Luke. Most of the first part deals with the successes and failures of Peter in spreading the good news of Jesus and presents an almost documentary view of the first Christian community, the trials before the Sanhedrin, the martyrdom of Philip and Stephen. Most of the second half of this five-hour+ film follows Paul from his conversion en route to Damascus, his work with Barnabas in Antioch of Syria, his debates on the old law versus the new, his arrest. The film ends with his imprisonment in Rome. Read More »

Nanni Moretti – Il grido d’angoscia dell’uccello predatore (20 tagli d’Aprile) AKA Anguished Cry Of Predator Bird (2003)

This short film is made up of sequences excluded from Aprile (1998) was founded on Aprile DVD9. Read More »

Giuseppe Ferrara – Cento giorni a Palermo (1984)

In the late 1970s and early 80s, assassinations in Sicily get the attention of Communist deputy, Pio La Torre, who appeals to General Carlo Alberto Dalla Chiesa to become prefect in Palermo and take on the Mafia. Dalla Chiesa approaches the job with the same focus and methods he used in hunting down the Red Brigade. His sweetheart, the much-younger Setti Carraro (everyone calls her Emanuela), wants to be with him in Palermo, but he sends her away, knowing he is in danger. Then, a few months into office, he asks her to marry him, and he tries to be both husband and investigator. Meanwhile, the Mafia bankers are feeling the heat, and they start with La Torre.
IMDB Read More »

Claude Autant-Lara – Tu ne tueras point AKA L’Objecteur AKA Non uccidere AKA Thou Shalt Not Kill (1961)

Synopsis by Hal Erickson
An Italian/French/Yugoslavian/Liechtensteinian coproduction (whew!), Thou Shalt Not Kill features Laurent Terzieff as a French conscientious objector. Interwoven with his story is the saga of a German priest (Horst Frank) who faces stiff punishment for killing a Frenchman during the Second World War. Director Claude Autant-Lara characteristically uses these twin plotlines as a platform to espouse his Leftist political beliefs and to heartily condemn the Catholic church. As a result, the fact-based Thou Shalt Not Kill (originally Tu Nes Tuera Point) caused quite a stir upon its first release. Many of its sentiments became more palatable in the late 1960s, though even at that time critics carped at Autant-Lara’s cut-and-dried directorial techniques. Read More »

Mario Monicelli & Steno – Vita da cani AKA It’s a Dog’s Life (1950)

Synopsis:
Tragicomedy telling of the trials and tribulations of a troupe of variety show artists. Read More »

Alberto Lattuada – Senza pietà AKA Without Pity (1948)

Filmed in 1948 as Senza Pieta, this Alberto Lattuada-directed effort came to America the following year as Without Pity. The film’s sensitive subject matter caused problems in distribution and approval; Lattuada was never known to shirk from a sociopolitical statement, even when it meant loss of revenue overseas. The plot is based on an actual postwar dilemma: in Northern Italy, dozens of black American GIs chose to go AWOL rather than return to a racially divided United States. John Kitzmiller plays an occupation soldier named Jerry, who decides to remain in Italy when he falls in love with a blonde, Caucasian local girl named Angela (Carla Del Poggio). Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – L’Età di Cosimo de Medici AKA The Age of Medici AKA The Age of Cosimo de Medici (1972)

Synopsis:
This three-part saga evokes the social, economic, and religious life of fifteenth-century Florence through two of its leading lights: banker Cosimo de’ Medici and art theorist Leon Battista Alberti. The Age of the Medici is like a Renaissance painting come to life. The three episodes of approximately 90 minutes each, begins as a movie about the shrewd worldliness of the banker Cosimo de’ Medici and ends as a tribute to the scholarly humanism of the author and architect Leon Battista Alberti. “Medicis” leaves us with an impression of Quattrocento Florence as a city of sublime harmony in which art and commerce are in perfect balance, seamlessly interdependent. Read More »