Tag Archives: Italian

Marco Ferreri – I Love You [+Extras] (1986)

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Synopsis
In another indictment of the flaws of our so-called civilization, this satire from the late director (Marco Ferreri) features (Christopher Lambert) as Michel, a miserable man who has failed at love and finds solace in a mechanical key holder. Michel has just been dumped by Barbara (Anemone) because he has not been able to get her pregnant. He is feeling pretty low when he finds a key holder with blue eyes and big red lips that responds to the sound of a whistle with “I Love You.” Michel tacks this gadget up on his TV set and whistles away. He seems happy with this fool-proof declaration of love until one day, the key holder responds to the neighbor’s whistle and Michel goes berserk. After all, if your key ring can’t be faithful, what’s the world coming to? ~ Eleanor Mannikka, All Movie Guide Read More »

Aldo Fabrizi – La famiglia Passaguai AKA The Passaguai Family (1951)

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PLOT SYNOPSIS:
Dalla commedia Cabina 27 di Anton Germano Rossi.
Una domenica al mare di Ostia del cavalier Peppe Passaguai con la moglie e i tre figli. Una macchina comica romanesca che ha le sue ascendenze nel repertorio del teatro dialettale, dell’avanspettacolo e dell’umorismo del settimanale Travaso degli anni ’30 ma anche postbellico, arricchito da trovate più cinematografiche (l’anguria) e da notazioni di costume sulla piccola borghesia. Soprattutto nel primo tempo non mancano le gag azzeccate né le macchiette colorite, appoggiate a caratteristi già affermati (T. Scotti) o in erba (C. Delle Piane). Fu seguita da La famiglia Passaguai fa fortuna (1952) e Papà diventa mamma (1953).
(Morandini) Read More »

Antonio Pietrangeli – La parmigiana AKA The Girl from Parma (1963)


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From IMDB:

Dora, driven away from her town by malicious gossip following her first love affair, has a series of short-lived adventures until she falls in love with Nino, a small time crook. In Parma, a police officer courts her but she keeps thinking of Nino and makes up her mind to join him. But he has found a new lover. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Operai, contadini AKA Workers, Peasants (2001)

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Based on the novel Le Donne di Messina by Elio Vittorini (1949).

A group of men and women gather together by chance after World War II when Italy was in the process of rebuilding. These men and women find themselves in the middle of ruins. They build a community where they try to protect themselves against hunger, violence, pain, and fear. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Dalla nube alla resistenza, aka: From the Cloud to the Resistance (1979)


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Straub/Huillet’s From the Cloud to the Resistance (1978) has been summarized by Straub as follows: ‘From the cloud, that is from the invention of the gods by man, to the resistance of the latter against the former as much as to the resistance against Fascism.

‘Dalla nube alla resistenza (From the Cloud to the Resistance ) (1978), based on two works by Cesare Pavese, falls into the category of History Lessons and Too Early, Too Late as well. It, too, has two parts—a twentieth-century text and a text regarding the myths of antiquity, each set in the appropriate landscape. Pavese’s The Moon and the Bonfires looks back on the violent deaths of Italian anti-Fascist resistance fighters; Dialogues with Leucò is a series of dialogues between heroes and gods, connecting myth and history and returning to an ambiguous stage in the creation of distinctions, such as that between animal and human, which are fundamental to grammar and language itself. Such a juxtaposition of political engagement with profoundly contemplative issues such as myth, nature, and meaning points to the characters of Empedocles and Antigone in the Hölderlin films.’

(Library Synopsis): Six dialogues between figures from Greek antiquity, taken from Cesare Pavese’s ‘Dialoghi con Leucò’, are followed by an episode set in modern times, taken from the same author’s novel ‘La Luna e i falò’. Read More »

Vittorio De Sica – Umberto D. [+Extras] (1952)

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Scott Tobias @ avclub.com July 22nd, 2003 wrote:
If the Italian neo-realist movement could be said to have a definite endpoint, it would probably be Vittorio De Sica’s 1952 film Umberto D., a huge international flop that was initially greeted with hostility at home and indifference abroad, but which has since resurfaced as a masterpiece. But apart from any fiscal reasons, the film may have ended neo-realism because it’s arguably its greatest example, taking the movement to a point of aesthetic purity from which it had nowhere else to go. Unlike other landmark De Sica films, such as 1946’s Shoe-Shine or 1948’s The Bicycle Thief, Umberto D. doesn’t press hard for sentiment or sweeping emotional crescendos, but simply embraces an old man’s often-mundane attempts to survive another month and hold on to what little he has. Read More »

Marco Bellocchio – Sorelle Mai (2010)

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Almost exclusively featuring his family, Bellocchio filmed over a ten year period with segments shot from 1999 to 2008. It begins when Elena (Bellocchio’s daughter, and an incredibly natural performer) is five. Elena’s mother, Sara (Finocchiaro), is an actress and is often away from home so Elena spends much of her time with her uncle Pier Giorgio (Bellocchio’s son), a frustrated artist. They live in the small town of Bobbio (Bellocchio’s hometown) with Pier Giorgio’s spinster aunts (Letizia and Maria Luisa Bellocchio).

Over ten years, the film follows these difficult relationships as the characters come and go from Bobbio, and Bellocchio captures the hopes, disappointments and yearnings of his own family. Moments from Bellocchio’s other films including Fist in His Pocket and The Nanny are also interspersed throughout as quick flashes that relate to the family’s onscreen drama. Read More »