Tag Archives: James Stewart

William Keighley – No Time for Comedy (1940)

Synopsis:
Playwright Gaylord Esterbrook scores a hit with his first Broadway play, both with the critics and with leading lady Linda Paige. He and Linda are happily married until a patroness of the arts convinces Esterbrook to forget about comedy and concentrate on writing a tragedy. The end result nearly destroys his career and his marriage. Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

Synopsis:
Ben McKenna (James Stewart), his wife Jo (Doris Day) and their boy Hank ride a bus bound for Marrakech. When the boy accidentally yanks the veil off a Moroccan woman, a smooth talking Frenchman diffuses the situation. Ben reveals that he’s a doctor, attended a medical convention in Paris and is visiting North Africa for a change of scenery. The Frenchman invites the couple to dinner, but Jo confides to her husband that she finds the man suspicious. Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – Rope (1948)

Rope (1948) is a film written by Hume Cronyn and Arthur Laurents, produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring James Stewart, John Dall and Farley Granger. It is the first of Hitchcock’s Technicolor films, and is notable for taking place in real time and being edited so as to appear as a single continuous shot through the use of long takes. Read More »

Frank Capra – Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (1939)

Review from FilmSite.org
————————————————————————
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) is producer/director Frank Capra’s classic comedy-drama, and considered by many to be his greatest achievement in film (and reminiscent of his earlier film, Mr. Deeds Goes To Town (1936)). [In fact, the film project by Columbia was first announced as Mr. Deeds Goes to Washington starring Gary Cooper, in a role similar to his previous Longfellow Deeds character.] Read More »

Richard Quine – Bell Book and Candle (1958)


29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

A Witch in Love; ‘Bell, Book and Candle’ at Fine Arts, Odeon

THE magic in “Bell, Book and Candle,” which opened at the Fine Arts and Odeon Theatres on Christmas, is not so much black as chromatic. It’s the color that’s bewitching in this film.

Actually, its story of a young lady who possesses some supernatural power, which she uses to inveigle a gentleman into falling in love with her, is neither as novel nor engaging as you might expect it to be. Pretty young ladies in movies are bewitching gaga fellows all the time with enticements and devices that are magic, so fas as the audience can tell. So the gimmick of John van Druten’s stage play, which has been used as the basis for this film — the gimmick of a woman endowed with witchcraft—is really rather silly and banal. Read More »

John Ford – The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance [+Extras] (1962)


29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

synopsis
Like Pontius Pilate, director John Ford asks “What is truth?” in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance–but unlike Pilate, Ford waits for an answer. The film opens in 1910, with distinguished and influential U.S. senator Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) and his wife Hallie (Vera Miles) returning to the dusty little frontier town where they met and married twenty-five years earlier. They have come back to attend the funeral of impoverished “nobody” Tom Doniphon (John Wayne). When a reporter asks why, Stoddard relates a film-long flashback. He recalls how, as a greenhorn lawyer, he had run afoul of notorious gunman Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin), who worked for a powerful cartel which had the territory in its clutches. Time and again, “pilgrim” Stoddard had his hide saved by the much-feared but essentially decent Doniphon. Read More »

Alfred Hitchcock – Vertigo [+Extras] (1958)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Review
One of Hitchcock’s most discussed films. Retired police detective Stewart, who has a fear of heights, is hired by old school chum in San Francisco to keep an eye on his wife (Novak), eventually falls in love with his quarry and that’s just the beginning; to reveal more would be unthinkable. Alec Coppel and Samuel Taylor scripted, from the novel D’entre les Morts by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac. Haunting, dream-like thriller, with riveting Bernard Herrmann score to match; a genuinely great motion picture that demands multiple viewings. Read More »