Tag Archives: Jean Renoir

Jean Renoir – La Marseillaise [+ Commentary] (1938)

A film about the early part of the French Revolution, shown from the eyes of the citizens of Marseille, counts in German exile and, of course, the king Louis XVI, each showing their own small problems. Read More »

Norman Lloyd – Carola (1973)

SYNOPSIS:
Originally produced in 1972 as a segment of the television series “Hollywood Television Theatre.”

Legendary filmmaker Jean Renoir’s suspenseful and romantic tale of a beautiful French actress struggling to avoid the deadly politics and forbidden passions of Nazi-occupied France.

During World War II, an acting company in occupied Paris is notified that a German officer will be stopping by to see their play. The stage manager–who also happens to be the lover of Carola, the lead actress–asks her to “play up” to the visiting German for the good of the play, but when the officer arrives, it becomes clear to the manager that the German and Carola have had a previous relationship, and that she is still in love with him. Read More »

Jean Renoir – Le déjeuner sur l’herbe AKA Picnic on the Grass (1959)

Synopsis:
Etienne Alexis, a candidate for president of the new Europe, is a scientist promoting artificial insemination for social betterment and therapy to eliminate passion. His wealthy household (his family owns chemical corporations that will profit from his ideas) is stiff, intellectual, and sterile. To celebrate his engagement to a German cousin, he hosts an aseptic picnic, where mother nature asserts herself. A shepherd’s flute conjures a windstorm that throws Alexis together with the luscious Nénette, a farm lass who wants to have a baby but is unimpressed with men. Read More »

Jean Renoir – La vie est à nous AKA The People of France (1936)

Quote:

A propaganda film produced by the French Communist Party (PCF) for the campaign for the May 1936 elections – which brought the Popular Front to power – “La vie est à nous”, by Jean Renoir, was shot by a team of militant filmmakers and technicians. Read More »

Jean Renoir – Le caporal épinglé aka The Elusive Corporal (1962)

Synopsis:
‘An upper-class corporal from Paris is captured by the Germans when they invade France in 1940. Assisted and accompanied by characters as diverse as a morose dairy farmer, a waiter, a myopic intellectual, a working-class Parisian, and a German dental assistant, the corporal tries to escape from prison camps, sometimes making it a few yards, sometimes reaching the French border.’
[email protected] (IMDb) Read More »

Jean Renoir – The River (1951)

Ignatiy Vishnevetsky wrote:
Is there a more pathetic object of desire than Captain John (Thomas E. Breen), the one-legged American who becomes a figure of romantic fantasy in The River? Breen was all of 26 at the time of filming, though like so many of the World War II generation, he seems a good decade older. His red hair is gelled back in sticky waves, his pants are belted mid-abdomen, and his shirts and jackets are cut baggy. His clothes drape awkwardly over his body, and at the pivotal moment of the film—the moment when Captain John’s false leg gives out from under him—they seem to drift an inch behind him, like parachutes unfurling too late. Read More »

Jean Renoir – Tire-au-flanc AKA The Sad Sack (1928)

A pretty rare early (and silent) Renoir, a kinda romantic-army-comedy about a fragile burgeoisie son who has (together with his his butler) to attend a full army drill. Several romantic interests soon kick in… Read More »