Tag Archives: Joe Dallesandro

Paul Morrissey – Blood for Dracula (1974)

Synopsis:
Udo Kier is without a doubt the sickliest of vampires in any director’s interpretation of the Bram Stoker tale. Count Dracula knows that if he fails to drink a required amount of pure virgin’s [pronounced “wirgin’s”] blood, it’s time to move into a permanent coffin. His assistant (Renfield?) suggests that the Count and he pick up his coffin and take a road trip to Italy, where families are known to be particularly religious, and therefore should be an excellent place to search for a virgin bride. They do, only to encounter a family with not one, but FOUR virgins, ready for marriage. The Count discovers one-by-one that the girls are not as pure as they say they are, meanwhile a handsome servant/Communist begins to observe strange behaviour from the girls who do spend the night with the Count. It’s a race for Dracula to discover who’s the real virgin, before he either dies from malnourishment or from the wooden stake of the Communist! Read More »

Serge Gainsbourg – Je t’aime moi non plus AKA I Love You, I Don’t (1976)

Quote:
Serge Gainsbourg’s Je T’Aime Moi Non Plus, the iconic singer-songwriter’s 1976 directorial debut, is on the surface the story of a love triangle. But nothing about this film is conventional. It’s set in an almost postapocalyptic wasteland that’s supposed to be somewhere in the American Midwest, if the signage and the locals’ penchant for fractious roller derbies is to be believed. (There’s even a visual joke that seems to riff on John Boorman’s Deliverance.) Two sides of the triangle are gay garbagemen, while the third is a boyish truck stop waitress. And Gérard Depardieu puts in a glorified cameo as an amorous hayseed who’s just a little too much into his horse. Read More »

Paul Morrissey – Trash AKA Andy Warhol’s Trash (1970)

Andy Warhol’s ‘Trash’ Arrives: Heroin Addict’s Life Is Theme of Film Techniques of 30’s on View at Cinema II
The opening credits (“Andy Warhol Presents Trash…” ) appear as words spelled out in little light bulbs of the sort still used on old theater marquees. On the soundtrack can be heard some breathless, tinny movie music taken from Josef von Sternberg’s “The Blue Angel.” Even if you don’t get the point immediately, you will soon after “Trash” begins. This second film by Paul Morrissey (his first was “Flesh,” described as a tribute to John Ford) is a relentless send-up of attitudes and gestures shanghaied from Hollywood’s glamorous nineteen-thirties and forties. Read More »

Paul Morrissey & Antonio Margheriti – Flesh for Frankenstein (1973)

In Serbia, Baron Frankenstein lives with the Baroness and their two children. He dreams of a super-race, returning Serbia to its grand connections to ancient Greece. In his laboratory, assisted by Otto, he builds a desirable female body, but needs a male who will be superbody and superlover. He thinks he has found just the right brain to go with a body he’s built, but he’s made an error, taking the head of a gay aesthete. Meanwhile, the Baroness has her lusts, and she fastens on Nicholas, a friend of the dead lad. Can the Baron pull off his grand plan? He brings the two zombies together to mate. Meanwhile, Nicholas tries to free his dead friend. What about the Baron’s children? Read More »