Tag Archives: Junko Natsu

Chûsei Sone – Furenzoku satsujin jiken AKA Unrelated Murder Cases (1977)

Perhaps inspired by the success of the detective novel adaptations of the 70’s, roman porno director Chûsei Sone decided to tackle his own version of the subject. This is exquisitely filmed (lots of wide shots, characters are almost always cramped together, etc.) and it’s certainly a worthy addition to the genre, with a great cast and featuring a young Yuya Uchida (RIP!). Read More »

Motohiro Torii – Sanbiki no mesubachi AKA Three Pretty Devils (1970)

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A trio of teenaged tarts try to earn money through shoplifting and prostitution scams and get into trouble deep. Hilarious scenes where the girls try to pick up gaijin at Osaka’s World Expo 70. A colorful kaleidoscope of nudity, violence, drama, yakuza machinations and music, with cameos by transvestite (transsexual?) singer/actor Ikehata Shinnosuke (aka “Peter”, see here and there), who still acts today and did voiceover for Death Note: The Last Name (!?) and Wada “Akko” Akiko who beats up yakuza thugs and croons the film’s theme song. Read More »

Satsuo Yamamoto – Senso to ningen III: Kanketsuhen AKA Men And War Part III (1973)

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Yamamoto Satsuo directed this masterful 9 hour epic trilogy on the effects of war on the five generations of a single Japanese family. Based on Gomikawa Jumpei’s (The Human Condition) bestselling novel, the film trilogy skillfully blends newsreel and archive footage with an all-star cast, exotic locations, and beautiful cinematography. The first part follows the rise of the Godai clan rise from war-profiteers to their becoming powerful industrialists in Japanese-occupied Manchuria during the 1930s. The second part follow the the stories of two brothers serving in different units of the Imperial Japanese army from 1935 to 1937 when Japan launched a full scale invasion of China. The third and final part details the family’s trials during the Sino-Japanese War to the Soviet army’s invasion of Japanese-occupied Northeastern China at the end of World War II. Read More »