Tag Archives: Kyôka Suzuki

Shinji Aoyama – Kôrogi AKA Crickets (2006)

Quote:
Kaoru, a woman in her 30s, is married to an older, blind and apparently mute man, whom she cares for in a house in a small coastal town on the Izu Peninsula. She claims to be dependent on him, but what binds them does not seem to be love. In her wandering, Kaoru discovers the bar of an association. Read More »

Kihachi Okamoto – Sukedachi-ya Sukeroku AKA Vengeance for Sale (2001)

Synopsis:
This is the final movie from Okamoto Kihachi, the filmmaker who directed such great movies as “Sword Of Doom”, “Kill”, and “Red Lion”. With an equal mix of violence and humor he has forged a career that spanned over 4 decades and created some of the most memorable films to ever come out of Japan. This is no exception, and the hand of a master is evident in his treatment of this highly entertaining story. In a world where vendettas are officially sanctioned, the people sometimes needed help in carrying out their vengeance. Read More »

Yoshimitsu Morita – 39 keihô dai sanjûkyû jô AKA Keiho (1999)

‘Keiho’ is a fascinating thriller dealing with memory, guilt and justice. A young actor is arrested for a brutal double murder. He confesses but pretty soon the possibility of him being mentally ill and therefore legally incompetent comes to the fore. A young female psychiatrist working on the case (called Kafka, interestingly enough!) becomes convinced that he is faking his apparent schizophrenia. All very good and ‘Primal Fear’ so far, but after that things get much more complicated, ambiguous and interesting. ‘Keiho’ is strongly acted, well written, and imaginatively directed, and will keep you guessing right until its’ final scenes. Supposedly based on a true case, unresolved at the time of the movies original release, this is a real gem that beats 90% of Hollywood’s lame and predictable thrillers at their own game. Try and see this one! Read More »

Kôki Mitani – Rajio no jikan aka Welcome Back, Mr. McDonald (1997)


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Quote:
Comedy is certainly not the first thing that comes to mind when we think of Japanese cinema. But a few more films like Koki Mitani’s hilarious screwball farce “Welcome Back, Mr. McDonald” could change all that.

This movie is ostensibly a goofy comedy about a live radio drama that goes haywire after the imperious diva playing the lead insists on certain last-minute changes. Her demands set in motion a desperate chain of events that transform a sudsy romantic drama set in a Japanese fishing village into a ludicrous action-adventure fantasy set in the United States.

“Welcome Back, Mr. McDonald” can be taken as pure, giddy fun in a farcical tradition that has all but disappeared from American movie comedy in the age of the salacious gross-out. But it can also be taken as a good-natured invitation to Japanese culture to lighten up. Its manic surface only partially conceals its satiric barbs. Read More »