Tag Archives: Lee J. Cobb

Elia Kazan – On the Waterfront (1954)

Quote:
Marlon Brando gives the performance of his career as the tough prizefighter-turned-longshoreman Terry Malloy in this masterpiece of urban poetry. A raggedly emotional tale of individual failure and social corruption, On the Waterfront follows Terry’s deepening moral crisis as he must decide whether to remain loyal to the mob-connected union boss Johnny Friendly (Lee J. Cobb) and Johnny’s right-hand man, Terry’s brother, Charley (Rod Steiger), as the authorities close in on them. Driven by the vivid, naturalistic direction of Elia Kazan and savory, streetwise dialogue by Budd Schulberg, On the Waterfront was an instant sensation, winning eight Oscars®, including for best picture, director, actor, supporting actress (Eva Marie Saint), and screenplay. Read More »

Michael Winner – Lawman (1971)

Synopsis:
In the dusty town of Bannock, a stray bullet fired by the gun-toting gang of cattle mogul Vincent Bronson’s drunken ranch hands results in the inadvertent murder of an innocent elderly bystander. As the culprits return to Bronson’s farm in Sabbath, Bannock’s fearless and unyielding law-man, Marshal Jered Maddox, rides into town to bring the killers back to stand trial, even though their powerful employer is willing to compensate for this unfortunate loss. The law is the law, and Maddox is bent on arresting them all. Who can escape the merciless Widow-maker? Read More »

Daniel Mann – Our Man Flint (1966)

Synopsis:
The world’s weather seems to have changed dramatically with violent storms everywhere and long dormant volcanoes suddenly erupting. No one is sure what is happening or why but when American intelligence chief Cramden loses yet another team of agents, there appears to be only one man who can do the job: Derek Flint, former super spy, incredibly rich and the ultimate ladies man. Despite Cramden’s concerns, Flint is on the job and soon discovers that the Earth’s weather is under the control of a secret organization known as GALAXY whose scientists are looking to pacify the world and devote humankind to scientific pursuits. Read More »

Gordon Douglas – In Like Flint (1967)

Former Z.O.W.I.E. spy Derek Flint (James Coburn) is called back from retirement after his former spy chief, Lloyd C. Cramden (Lee J. Cobb), is framed for prurient behavior with a prostitute, and U.S. President Trent (Andrew Duggan) experiences an incident of “lost time.” After Flint discovers irregularities on a recently launched space-station mission, he realizes that an international conspiracy is afoot. He travels the world and assumes myriad disguises to unravel the nefarious plot. Read More »

Henry Hathaway – Call Northside 777 (1948)

Synopsis:
When a woman places an ad in the Chicago Times offering a $5,000 reward for information that will exonerate her son, the newspaper assigns reporter P.J. McNeal to look into the case. He learns that eleven years earlier, Frank Wiecek was convicted of killing an on duty police officer in a speakeasy and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. McNeal is quite skeptical as to his innocence and only slowly comes to realize that there was a miscarriage of justice. The real question is whether he can find evidence that would convince the pardon board and obtain Wiecek’s release. Read More »

Sidney Lumet – 12 Angry Men (1957)

Synopsis:
A Puerto Rican youth is on trial for murder, accused of knifing his father to death. The twelve jurors retire to the jury room, having been admonished that the defendant is innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Eleven of the jurors vote for conviction, each for reasons of his own. The sole holdout is Juror #8, played by Henry Fonda. As Fonda persuades the weary jurors to re-examine the evidence, we learn the backstory of each man. Juror #3 (Lee J. Cobb), a bullying self-made man, has estranged himself from his own son. Juror #7 (Jack Warden) has an ingrained mistrust of foreigners; so, to a lesser extent, does Juror #6 (Edward Binns). Jurors #10 (Ed Begley) and #11 (George Voskovec), so certain of the infallibility of the Law, assume that if the boy was arrested, he must be guilty. Juror #4 (E.G. Marshall) is an advocate of dispassionate deductive reasoning. Read More »

Rudolph Maté – The Dark Past (1948)

Quote:
Taken hostage along with his family and friends, psychologist Andrew Collins (Lee J. Cobb) is held by the murderous fugitive Al Walker (William Holden) and his gang. While Walker’s crew, which includes his lover, Betty (Nina Foch), tends to the other hostages, the desperate mastermind talks to Collins about his troubled past. As the night progresses, Collins gets Walker to focus on a disturbing dream, resulting in a psychological breakthrough that may help avoid a violent conflict. Read More »