Tag Archives: Mandarin

Cheh Chang – Mai ming xiao zi AKA The Magnificent Ruffians (1979)

A tale of lies and revenge. A local Kung fu master hopes to monopolise, but family in his way is protected by a great martial artist. The evil lord hires 4 local beggars all masters in their own arts (pole, swords, kicking, axe) and tells them lies about the young fighter to sour their feelings on him causing them to challenge him to a duel. But after countless fights between them they all realize that they are much better friends then enemies, until one of the fighters is sabotaged and kills the young fighter. Being mistakin for a killer the other 3 turn their backs on him and chase him off swearing revenge until they find out what the real story is. Amazing weopon work that only the venoms could show you. Another first class story line, hands down just another great venoms movie period. Read More »

Siew Hua Yeo – A Land Imagined (2018)

Winner of the top prize at last year’s Locarno Film Festival, Yeo Siew Hua’s third feature is a clever, evocative shape-shifter that begins as a kind of dreamy noir and ends up a sober, politically incisive work of social realism. First we follow gruff, disenchanted detective Lok (Peter Yu) as he searches for Wang (Liu Xiaoyi), a missing construction worker from mainland China. We’re then ushered back in time to see Wang’s life before his disappearance—and what had seemed a typical noir scenario instead turns out to be far more in line with reality as we know it today. Read More »

Xiaolu Guo – Jintian De Yu Zenme Yang ? AKA How Is Your Fish Today ? (2006)

A young man in southern China has killed his lover. He starts a lonely escape across the whole country towards his land of wonder, a snowy village at the northern border. Sitting at his desk in Beijing, a scriptwriter is writing that man’s story. It is through his characters that his life gains its weight, meaning and freedom. His imagination blurs the boundaries between reality and fiction. The snowy village lies on the quiet border between China and Russia. Old villagers fish under the ice, school children study English text about America. They endure the long winter nights waiting for the sun to come back… Read More »

Elvis Lu – The Shepherds (2018)

Despite harsh condemnation and denunciation from society, a heterosexual female pastor founded Taiwan’s first LGBT-affirming church in May 1996. For LGBT Christians, who had been rejected by the Christian community for a long time, they finally have a church that offers them a safe haven. Though the founder has passed away, the church members continue to make their voice heard, confronting the unjust social institutions while struggling with religious conflict at the same time. Come hell or high water, they strive to make a difference in the lives of others by telling their own life stories, in hope that love will eventually trump hate and solve misunderstanding someday. Read More »

Ming-liang Tsai – Tian bian yi duo yun AKA The Wayward Cloud [+Extras] (2005)

Quote:
Hsiao-Kang, now working as a pornographic actor, meets Shiang-chyi once again. Meanwhile, the city of Taipei faces a water shortage that makes the sales of watermelons skyrocket. Read More »

Peter Chan – Tau ming chong aka The Warlords (2007)

The film is set in the 1860s, during the Taiping Rebellion in the late Qing Dynasty in China. The story, based on an unresolved crime in 1870, tells of three sworn brothers (played by Andy Lau, Jet Li and Takeshi Kaneshiro) who are forced to turn against one another due to the harsh realities of war and political intrigue. Read More »

Ming-liang Tsai – He liu AKA The River (1997)

Quote:
An unemployed young man named Hsiao-Kang (Lee Kang-sheng) passes idle time at a local Taipei mall when he encounters an old friend (Chen Shiang-chyi) on the opposite escalator. With time on his hands, he agrees to accompany her back to the location shoot where she is working as a production assistant for a film. At the site, the director is displeased with the unrealistic appearance of a mannequin intended to represent a dead body floating on the river, and asks the aimless Hsiao-Kang to act as a stand-in for the shot. Read More »