Tag Archives: Marcel Hanoun

Marcel Hanoun – Un film (autoportrait) (1985)

The shooting diary of a film shot in France and in the United States. Using photos of Paris and of New York City, excerpts of his former films, statements by friends of his and shooting sequences of the film itself, tormented filmmaker Marcel Hanoun has made a heterogeneous and unclassifiable film about the difficulty of filming. Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – L’authentique procès de Carl-Emmanuel Jung (1966)

“It’s virtually impossible to think of a major contemporary French filmmaker who has been more independent, hence more consistently marginalized, than Marcel Hanoun (1929–2012). Born in Tunis, he immigrated to France immediately after the war and, as Bernard Benoliel and Nicole Brenez put it, “gradually taught himself the techniques of cinema, without the help of any formal schooling and apprenticeship.” Despite the fact that he remained on the margins of “the French cinema” as we know it (in terms of state support, distribution, and critical attention), he managed to make an astonishing 70 films over the course of his career. Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – L’été (1968)

Quote:
After the event of May1968, a young woman shelters in the country, in a house where she waits for her partner.

Quote:
“…‘Who creates? And for whom?’ What is important is that Hanoun does not answer these questions in a grandiloquent way. On the contrary, far from showing a series of dramatic actions, he focuses on the in-between moments in the life of his beautiful young protagonist. He plays with fragments of the scene, reframing the image, using frames (doors, windows, a mirror as a tableau vivant) and all of this confronts the viewer with a sort of catalog of repetitive acts, where drama and character development are absent. Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – L’hiver (1969)

Synopsis:
Julien et son preneur de son, Michel, tournent à Bruges un documentaire de commande. Julien rêve au film qu’il pourrait tourner dans cette ville mystérieuse: une adaptation de Shakespeare ou de Musset. Le rejoint bientôt Sophie, sa femme, ancienne comédienne, qui souffre de la distance que Julien semble mettre dans leurs rapports. Bientôt, à une exposition de peinture, elle rencontre un artiste qu’elle voit sous les traits de Julien et qui l’invite à venir visiter Florence. Elle confie à Michel ses tourments. Julien, de son côté, vient d’accepter la proposition de son producteur: réaliser une “histoire” avec des “personnages” et, pourquoi pas, des “vedettes”… Alors qu’elle semblait décidée à suivre l’inconnu, Sophie se jette dans les bras de Julien. Le metteur en scène qui tourne un film intitulé “L’hiver” demande une nouvelle prise. Pour la seconde fois, Sophie se jette dans les bras de Julien. Le peintre inconnu s’en va…
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Marcel Hanoun – Le printemps (1971)

One could only enumerate the elements to let the film tell itself. And this is besides one possible purpose of Hanoun here. Just let things communicate between themselves without the coercition of usual continuums (space and time) and let’s see and feel what happens. Yet there are clues given, relations but they are separated when one could await a close editing and vice versa. There seems to have two worlds, cinematographic worlds I mean : B&W and colour and things circulate from one world to another, people too…

But let’s just enumerate Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – L’automne (1972)



Synopsis: Julien, a movie director, is on the phase of editing his new film, “Juliette sacrifiée”. Hurried by his producer, he asks for the help of a professional editor. It is Anne, with whom Julien is soon falling in love. During the whole of the movie, both are sitting in front of the editing table, where they listen to music, talk about politics and what movies should and should not be about, make love, and finally end up editing the film as was planned. Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – Une simple histoire AKA A Simple Story (1959)

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Quote:
Hanoun made “Une Simple Histoire” in 1958, but it looks more like 1938, with its dark, low-contrast photography (it was shot in 16-mm.), its unglamorous realism, and its heroine with her penciled eyebrows and her unstylishly bobbed hair. The heroine (Micheline Bezançon, the only player given credit in the program, although there are several other important roles) is a poor youngish woman who, with her little daughter, comes to Paris looking for a job. She doesn’t get a job, and when, eventually, she can’t afford a place to sleep she spends a night out of doors. She is discovered by a kindly older woman who takes her in (this is where the movie actually begins), and in whose apartment, in one extended flashback, she tells her story. Read More »