Tag Archives: Mario Adorf

Antonio Pietrangeli – Io la conoscevo bene AKA I Knew Her Well (1965)

Quote:
Following the gorgeous, seemingly liberated Adriana (Divorce Italian Style’s Stefania Sandrelli) as she chases her dreams in the Rome of La dolce vita, I Knew Her Well is at once a delightful immersion in the popular music and style of Italy in the sixties and a biting critique of its sexual politics and the culture of celebrity. Over a series of intimate episodes, just about every one featuring a different man, a new hairstyle, and an outfit to match, the unsung Italian master Antonio Pietrangeli, working from a script he cowrote with Ettore Scola, composes a deft, seriocomic character study that never strays from its complicated central figure. I Knew Her Well is a thrilling rediscovery, by turns funny, tragic, and altogether jaw-dropping. Read More »

Peter Fleischmann – La faille AKA Weak Spot (1975)

Greece 1974 – during the brutal era of the military government, an innocent tourist manager (Ugo Tognazzi) is accused of being a member of the illegal resistance movement. Two secret agents (Michel Piccoli and Mario Adorf) are bringing the innocent victim to Athens. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Klassenverhältnisse AKA Class Relations [+Extra] (1984)

The Lincoln Center wrote:
Straub and Huillet were frequently drawn to unfinished texts—Hölderlin’s The Death of Empedocles, Schoenberg’s Moses and Aaron—and for Class Relations, one of their supreme accomplishments, they turned to Kafka’s never-completed Amerika. “Kafka, for us,” Straub declared, “is the only major poet of industrial civilization, I mean, a civilization where people depend on their work to survive.” Kafka never did visit the America of his novel, so perhaps it’s fitting that the saga of Karl Rossmann, a teenage immigrant from Europe who arrives to a strange new land rife with swindlers and hypocrites, was largely shot in Hamburg. The style of Straub-Huillet, with their Brechtian performances, long takes, and static framing, is often characterized as “austere,” yet such a description belies the extraordinary richness of their images, the palpable weight of their direct-sound, and the invigorating clarity of their political commitment. Read More »

Luigi Comencini – A cavallo della tigre AKA On the Tiger’s Back (1961)

This well-acted though conventional comedy-drama by director Luigi Comencini features comic Nino Manfredi in the title role of Giacinto, a father and husband who has been driven to steal in order to survive. His ineptitude lands him in jail where he meets up with slightly more hardened criminals, like Tagliabue (Mario Aldorf), a killer, and Il Sorcio (Raymond Bussieres), an experienced thief. Giacinto is anxious to escape and get back to his family but Tagliabue and the thief also want out as soon as possible. And even if Giacinto escapes, the challenges that wait for him on the other side of the bars may be more than he can handle.
~ Eleanor Mannikka, All Movie Guide Read More »

Aldo Lado – La corta notte delle bambole di vetro AKA Short Night of Glass Dolls (1971)

Synopsis:
Greg Moore, an American journalist visiting Prague with his girlfriend Mira is found dead. However, he’s actually only temporarily paralyzed, but the coroner fails to realize this and proceeds to prepare him for the autopsy. While Moore awaits his doom, he tries to recollect what has happened to him. It all starts when his girl disappears. He asks his friend, a local journalist, for help. They discover that this was just the latest in a series of disappearances of young pretty girls in the area. Their investigation leads them to a strange high profile private club, whose affluent members practice odd ritualistic orgies and bizarre dark rites. Read More »

Roland Klick – Deadlock [+ Extras] (1970)

A young man stumbles through the Mexican Sierra, shot and half bled to death, carrying a suitcase containing the loot from a bank robbery. Passing out, he is found by Charles Dump, a former gold miner living on the outskirts of a ghost town with his daughter. Read More »

Renato Castellani – Questi fantasmi AKA Ghosts – Italian Style (1967)

Plot:
Questi fantasmi is based on what was a very popular play by Eduardo De Filippo. In fact, so popular that it was filmed three times during the ’50s and ’60s. The version uploaded here was the latter of these three adaptations, directed by Renato Castellani, and starring Vittorio Gassman and Sophia Loren in the principal parts of the married couple, who moves into a house that may or may not be haunted. Its “classic” pedigree notwithstanding, the film feels very much like a ’60s production, and it is not Castellani’s best work, even if the charming performances by Gassman and (especially) Loren manage to keep things interesting. Possibly best of all is the opening sequence depicting the moment the two fall in love on a rooftop. over a cup of coffee, so to speak. Read More »