Tag Archives: Mireille Darc

Gilles Grangier & Georges Lautner – Les Bons Vivants AKA Un Grand Seigneur AKA High Lifers AKA How to Keep the Red Lamp Burning (1965)

Pleasure-seekers deal with the official closing of French bordellos after the passing of the 1949 legislation outlawing the houses of ill repute. Part two finds a former prostitute who is besieged by former associates after she pulls off a successful robbery attempt. The final segment has a wealthy but sanctimonious patron offering a joy girl a place to stay. His house becomes a popular meeting place when his friends and the prostitute’s friends get together for fun and games. Read More »

Alain Delon – Pour la peau d’un flic AKA For a Cop’s Hide (1981)

Synopsis:
In Paris, the ex-cop Choucas is a private detective that works with a mysterious partner, Tarpon, and the secretary Charlotte. He is presently working in an embezzlement case of an employee of the pharmacist Jude. When the middle-aged Isabelle Pigot hires him to investigate the disappearance of her blind twenty year-old daughter Marthe Pigot that worked at the Drillard Foundation for blinds, the Police Inspector Coccioli seeks Choucas out and asks him to drop the case. But Choucas proceeds with the investigation and schedules an encounter with Isabelle in a square, but she is murdered with a shot on the forehead. Read More »

Georges Lautner – La valise AKA Man in the Trunk (1973)

Having succeeded in making himself the enemy of the entire Arab world, Commander Bloch, a senior agent in the Israeli secret services, flees to Libya and soon finds himself holed up in the French Embassy in Tripoli. His only hope of leaving the country alive is by being smuggled out in a diplomatic suitcase. Captain Augier is tasked with this delicate mission, but before the suitcase can reach Paris an airport strike takes effect. As a result, Augier and Bloch end up being confined to a hotel, which just happens to be the same hotel where the Israeli spy met the one true love of his life, Françoise. As he recalls this earlier romantic interlude in his life Bloch manages to convince himself that Françoise is the person who betrayed him. Read More »

Edouard Molinaro – L’homme presse AKA The Hurried Man [+Extras] (1977)

Synopsis:
“A forty-something antiques dealer, Pierre Noix is a busy man, in just about every aspect of his life. Having bought a large house in Provence built on the remains of a Roman structure, he wastes no time digging around for some long lost treasure. Pierre’s plans are threatened, first by the town’s mayor, who is about to authorise the construction of a motel in the area, and then by Edwige, the daughter of the previous owner of the estate. When Edwige queries the legitimacy of the sale, Noix responds by seducing and marrying her, all in record time. Unfortunately, his troubles are far from over…”
– Films de France Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – Week End AKA Weekend [+Extras] (1967)

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SYNOPSIS
The master of the French New Wave indicts consumerism and elaborates on his personal vision of Hell with this raucous, biting satire. A nasty, scheming bourgeois Parisian couple embarks on a journey through the countryside to her father’s house, where they pray for his death and a subsequent inheritance. Their trip is at first delayed, and later it is distracted by several outrageous events and characters including an apocalyptic traffic jam, a group of fictional philosophers, a couple of violent carjackers, and eventually, a gross display of cannibalism. By the time the film concludes, their seemingly simple journey has deteriorated into a freewheeling philosophical diatribe that leaves no topic unscathed. With Week End, Jean-Luc Godard reaches an impressive plateau of film originality, incorporating inter-titles, extended tracking shots, and music to add an entirely new grammar to film language. The result is a deeply challenging work that will most certainly invigorate some viewers just as much as it will as frustrate others. Standout highlights include a jarring, sexually graphic opening monologue shot with a roaming camera and blaring musical accompaniment, and the infamous traffic jam scene, where an endless parade of cars sit bumper to bumper amidst burning cars, picnics, and honking horns. The work of a true artist and pioneer, Godard’s Week End is a landmark film that hasn’t aged or lessened in impact over time.
(Taken from Rotten Tomatoes) Read More »