Tag Archives: Paul Morrissey

Paul Morrissey – Blood for Dracula (1974)

Synopsis:
Udo Kier is without a doubt the sickliest of vampires in any director’s interpretation of the Bram Stoker tale. Count Dracula knows that if he fails to drink a required amount of pure virgin’s [pronounced “wirgin’s”] blood, it’s time to move into a permanent coffin. His assistant (Renfield?) suggests that the Count and he pick up his coffin and take a road trip to Italy, where families are known to be particularly religious, and therefore should be an excellent place to search for a virgin bride. They do, only to encounter a family with not one, but FOUR virgins, ready for marriage. The Count discovers one-by-one that the girls are not as pure as they say they are, meanwhile a handsome servant/Communist begins to observe strange behaviour from the girls who do spend the night with the Count. It’s a race for Dracula to discover who’s the real virgin, before he either dies from malnourishment or from the wooden stake of the Communist! Read More »

Andy Warhol & Paul Morrissey – Chelsea Girls (1966)

Synopsis:
Lacking a formal narrative, Warhol’s art house classic follows various residents of the Chelsea Hotel in 1966 New York City, presented in a split screen with a single audio track in conjunction with one side of screen. Read More »

Paul Morrissey – Trash AKA Andy Warhol’s Trash (1970)

Andy Warhol’s ‘Trash’ Arrives: Heroin Addict’s Life Is Theme of Film Techniques of 30’s on View at Cinema II
The opening credits (“Andy Warhol Presents Trash…” ) appear as words spelled out in little light bulbs of the sort still used on old theater marquees. On the soundtrack can be heard some breathless, tinny movie music taken from Josef von Sternberg’s “The Blue Angel.” Even if you don’t get the point immediately, you will soon after “Trash” begins. This second film by Paul Morrissey (his first was “Flesh,” described as a tribute to John Ford) is a relentless send-up of attitudes and gestures shanghaied from Hollywood’s glamorous nineteen-thirties and forties. Read More »

Paul Morrissey & Antonio Margheriti – Flesh for Frankenstein (1973)

In Serbia, Baron Frankenstein lives with the Baroness and their two children. He dreams of a super-race, returning Serbia to its grand connections to ancient Greece. In his laboratory, assisted by Otto, he builds a desirable female body, but needs a male who will be superbody and superlover. He thinks he has found just the right brain to go with a body he’s built, but he’s made an error, taking the head of a gay aesthete. Meanwhile, the Baroness has her lusts, and she fastens on Nicholas, a friend of the dead lad. Can the Baron pull off his grand plan? He brings the two zombies together to mate. Meanwhile, Nicholas tries to free his dead friend. What about the Baron’s children? Read More »

Andy Warhol – I, a Man (1967)

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Color/Sound/95 mins at 24 fps
(filmed late July 1967)

Tom Baker/Bettina Coffin/Stephanie Graves/Cynthia May/
Ivy Nicholson/Nico/Valerie Solanis/Ingrid Superstar/Ultra Violet

Tom Baker: “The first time I sensed impending danger was during a scene with Ivy Nicholson. She had stipulated that she would not appear on camera with me in the nude. Shortly after the scene began I walked out of the frame and removed the towel I was wearing in order to put on my pants. Clad only in unlaundered bikini underwear, Ivy exploded in an emotional fury and stormed out of the room in tears, claiming she had been betrayed. I was talking with Warhol, who was very much perplexed by Ivy’s behaviour since, as he casually pointed out, ‘Ivy’ll cut her wrists for me…’ My third scene was with Valerie Solanis. I felt no personal threat from Valerie. Just the opposite. I found her intelligent, funny, almost charming, and very, very frightened.” (POP273) Read More »