Tag Archives: Raoul Ruiz

Raoul Ruiz – Het dak van de Walvis AKA On Top of the Whale (1982) (HD)

Quote:
A parody of anthropology, linguistics, and cultural imperialism. The film follows an unlikely team of linguists into the wilds of an ersatz Patagonia to study the last speakers of a dying language. That language apparently consists of a single word, which therefore means everything. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – La Recta Provincia (2007)

Synopsis:
Once upon a time there was a man. He lived with his mother, and worked as the caretaker of a large country house in Chile. One day the man found a bone in the garden. The bone had holes in it – it was a flute. The man took the flute and began to play it. The music turned into a song, and the voice singing the song begged the man to look for the other bones of a body scattered here and there. So the man and his mother set off following every path – that of God and those of the devil -, looking for the bones so that they could put the skeleton of the Christian man back together again and give him a Christian burial. And they saw what they saw, and lived what they lived. Many a story. And although they never told their tale to anyone, others told it for them. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Mistérios de Lisboa AKA Mysteries of Lisbon [TV version] (2010)

Synopsis
Follows a jealous countess, a wealthy businessman, and a young orphaned boy across Portugal, France, Italy and Brazil where they connect with a variety of mysterious individuals. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Régime sans pain (1985)

Jonathan Rosenbaum from Essential Cinema: On the Necessity of Film Canons (2004), pp. 236-237:

Within my experience, Ruiz is the least neurotic of filmakers; he doesn’t even seem to care whether what he’s doing is good or not (and, as he’s aptly noted, bad work and good work generally entail the same amount of effort). No single film functions as the be-all or end-all of an evolving career but merely as part of an overall process. Example: the 1985 Régime sans pain — one of his films most influenced by his friend Jean Baudrillard, and perhaps the one that most calls to mind grade-Z SF — grew out of a commission to direct a music video. Ruiz offered a counterproposal that he direct several music videos rather than one; once this deal was made, he shot enough material to interconnect the various videos until he arrived at a feature. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Mammame (1986)

Capsule by Jonathan Rosenbaum
From the Chicago Reader

Except for The Red Shoes, this shot-by-shot rethinking of a dance performance by the Emile Dubois Dance Group, choreographed by Jean-Claude Gallotta and directed by Raul Ruiz, could be the greatest dance film ever made. Running only 65 minutes, the 1986 film is as much a sensual workout as Ruiz’s Life Is a Dream is an intellectual one; its celebration of pure physicality and movement is as exciting for film lovers as it is for dance enthusiasts. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Comédie de l’innocence AKA Comedy of Innocence (2000)

Quote:

After Calderón and Proust, Comédie de l’innocence is another literary adaptation, this time from the little-known Italian surrealist Massimo Bontempelli. Updated from the last fin de siècle to this more recent time of uncertainty, Comédie de l’innocence’s plot is small but perfectly formed. With Aristotelian rigour it moves from the opening conundrum (a child torn between two mothers), through the complication (the confrontation between the mothers and Ariane’s brother Serge), to a satisfying conclusion. Ruiz, who takes a co-credit as scriptwriter with Françoise Dumas, keeps up the tension, however, with laconic and enigmatic dialogue. When Ariane visits the empty flat of Isabella, a nosy neighbour remarks: ‘I really don’t want to know.’ Ariane replies: ‘There is nothing to know.’ Read More »

Raoul Ruiz & Valeria Sarmiento – La Telenovela Errante (2017)

“The film revolves around the concept of soap opera. Its structure is based on the assumption that Chilean reality does not exist, but rather is an ensemble of soap operas. There are four audiovisual provinces, and the threat of war is felt among the factions. The political and economic problems are immersed in a fictional jelly divided into evening episodes. The entire Chilean reality is viewed from the point of view of the soap opera, which acts as a revealing filter of this same reality”. (Raúl Ruiz) Read More »