Tag Archives: Richard Johnson

Val Guest – 80,000 Suspects (1963)

Synopsis:
British doctor Richard Johnson arrives in the city of Bath, where a smallpox epidemic has broken out. If he has any hope of stemming the disease, he must locate and isolate its source. As if he hasn’t got enough trouble on his hands, Johnson must contend with his failing marriage to Claire Bloom. Director Val Guest lifts 80,000 Suspects out of the ordinary with his inventive utilization of darkness and shadows.
— Hal Erickson. Read More »

Mircea Dragan – Columna AKA The Column (1968)

The Roman Emperor Trajan has just murdered all the local men of Dacia and holds a military stronghold in what will later become Rumania. He places a Roman centurion in his place to occupy his latest conquest. After lopping off the head of the Dacian warlord, the soldier uses his blood-stained hands to dine on cheese and bread, unable to suppress his laughter. The centurion has a change of heart when he is put in charge of the region, freely dispensing justice and forgiveness to the conquered inhabitants. When the peace is threatened by marauding barbarians in masks of fur, the locals help the Romans fend off the invasion. Read More »

Damiano Damiani – La strega in amore AKA The Witch in Love (1966)

Synopsis:
‘A historian is called to a creepy old castle to help a strange old widow catalogue her erotic antiquities. He then meets her dark, seductive daughter and finds he is falling under her erotic spell. Incapable of forcing himself to leave, he spirals helplessly into their strange supernatural world.’ Read More »

Ralph Thomas – Deadlier Than the Male (1967)

Synopsis:
When two oil company executives are found dead, insurance company investigator Hugh “Bulldog” Drummond (Richard Johnson) is brought onto the case. Soon, Drummond and his young mod nephew, Robert (Steve Carlson), are circling the globe on the trail of a pair of gorgeous assassins, Irma (Elke Sommer) and Penelope (Sylva Koscina), who dispatch important businessmen after ensnaring them with their feminine wiles. The film updates a popular 1920s British mystery series for the swinging ’60s. Read More »

Robert Wise – The Haunting (1963)

Synopsis:
Dr. John Markway, an anthropologist with an interest in psychic phenomena, takes two specially selected women to Hill House, a reportedly haunted mansion. Eleanor (Julie Harris), a lonely, eccentric woman with a supernatural event in her past, and the bold Theodora (Claire Bloom), who has ESP, join John and the mansion’s heir, cynical Luke (Russ Tamblyn). They are immediately overwhelmed by strange sounds and events, and Eleanor comes to believe the house is alive and speaking directly to her. Read More »

Don Sharp – Hennessy (1975)

Quote:
Hennessy is an Irishman who believes in peace, but who has had connections to the IRA. After his family is killed, and he plots revenge, setting out to assassinate Queen Elizabeth II. Read More »

Ovidio G. Assonitis – Chi sei? aka The Devil Within Her aka Beyond The Door (1974)

IMDB User wrote:
I won’t waste time summarizing the plot for this film since the other users have done quite a good job themselves. Basically, you’ve got just one more in a stream of films that cashed in on the success of William Friedkin’s 1973 classic “The Exorcist”. I can only recommend “Beyond the Door” to those who enjoy these types of movies. Director Ovidio G. seems to be the Italian version of William Girdler, who directed his own “exorcist” knock-off that same year with “Abby”, a blaxsploitation version that was actually taken out of theaters after two weeks due to a lawsuit filed by Warner Brothers for plagiarism. If I’m correct, “Beyond the Door” was also attacked by Warner Brothers but I’m not sure what the outcome of that one was. It did manage to stay in the theaters though and actually did good at the box office. “Beyond the Door” copies “The Exorcist” in almost every way and you will either hate it or love it. This time, instead of a young girl, we have Juliet Mills (Nanny and the Professor, Passions) who levitates, vomits, spins her head around, and curses like a sailor, saying things like “lick the whore’s vomit” in a demonic voice. Read More »