Tag Archives: Stefania Sandrelli

Antonio Pietrangeli – Io la conoscevo bene AKA I Knew Her Well (1965)

Quote:
Following the gorgeous, seemingly liberated Adriana (Divorce Italian Style’s Stefania Sandrelli) as she chases her dreams in the Rome of La dolce vita, I Knew Her Well is at once a delightful immersion in the popular music and style of Italy in the sixties and a biting critique of its sexual politics and the culture of celebrity. Over a series of intimate episodes, just about every one featuring a different man, a new hairstyle, and an outfit to match, the unsung Italian master Antonio Pietrangeli, working from a script he cowrote with Ettore Scola, composes a deft, seriocomic character study that never strays from its complicated central figure. I Knew Her Well is a thrilling rediscovery, by turns funny, tragic, and altogether jaw-dropping. Read More »

Luigi Comencini & Nanni Loy & Luigi Magni – Quelle strane occasioni AKA Strange Occasion (1976)

The first episode with Paolo Villaggio was the centre of controversy over its tastelessness, resulting in director Loy removing his name from it. The star resides in Amsterdam with his wife, making very little money selling specialty Italian food; one day he crosses paths with a local bigwig who notices the generous size of his member and, soon, Villaggio starts bringing home lots of dough – appearing in mask and costume, billed as the “Italian Superman”, in live porn shows making love to nubile girls stretched out on a large plate of pasta! Read More »

Carlo Lizzani – L’amante di Gramigna AKA The Bandit (1969)

Sinopsis

Gramigna and his father are robbed of their field by Baron Nardò. The Baron let the field to Assunta and Gemma that is secretly beloved of Gramigna. Gemma succeeded to escape with Gramigna the day of her marriage with Ramarro. Love, violence, murder, revenge will follow all the protagonists till the desperate end of their existences.
– Written by 1felco Read More »

Bernardo Bertolucci – Il conformista AKA The Conformist (1970) (HD)

This story opens in 1938 in Rome, where Marcello has just taken a job working for Mussollini and is courting a beautiful young woman who will make him even more of a conformist. Marcello is going to Paris on his honeymoon and his bosses have an assignment for him there. Look up an old professor who fled Italy when the fascists came into power. At the border of Italy and France, where Marcello and his bride have to change trains, his bosses give him a gun with a silencer. In a flashback to 1917, we learn why sex and violence are linked in Marcello’s mind. Read More »

Bernardo Bertolucci – Il conformista AKA The Conformist (1970)

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This story opens in 1938 in Rome, where Marcello has just taken a job working for Mussollini and is courting a beautiful young woman who will make him even more of a conformist. Marcello is going to Paris on his honeymoon and his bosses have an assignment for him there. Look up an old professor who fled Italy when the fascists came into power. At the border of Italy and France, where Marcello and his bride have to change trains, his bosses give him a gun with a silencer. In a flashback to 1917, we learn why sex and violence are linked in Marcello’s mind. (IMDb) Read More »

Tinto Brass – La chiave aka The key (1983)

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R E V I E W B Y D E R E K H I L L
Director Tinto Brass is a man of big passions. His films — excluding Caligula (1980), which doesn’t really fit into his overall body of work — are filled with curvaceous women who are uninhibited and bold enough to freely express their healthy appetites for sex. Brass’ camera lovingly (and intrusively) explores the many facets of a woman’s beauty, be it physical or psychological. Brass also isn’t shy about what he likes most about a woman’s body, either — her ample backside. The bigger the better.
Although Brass would probably chuckle at the idea that his films have a strong feminist slant, Brass’ female leads are strong, independent, and almost heroic in their quests to become emancipated from their roles as housewives, concubines, or mothers. Less cartoonish than his American counterpart Russ Meyer’s heroines, Brass’ ladies actually exude a real humanity with their sensuality.
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