Tag Archives: Tatsuya Nakadai

Satsuo Yamamoto – Tengu-to aka Blood End (1969)

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BLOOD END is one of the great unknown films from Japan’s golden era of the late 1960’s. Starring NAKADAI Tatsuya in one of his best roles, this is the story of the Mito Tengu Group who attempted to overthrow the Shogunate at the beginning of the Bakumatsu Period. Their political aspirations led to countless assassinations, as well as senseless killing of innocent people who got in their way. Sentaro (NAKADAI), a farmer who’s been severely beaten for his outspoken defiance of the government and the high taxes during a time of famine is befriended by one of the group’s leaders, KADA Gentaro (KATO Go) and joins up. Read More »

Hideo Gosha – Goyokin (1969)

Synopsis: “Former samurai Magobei is forced to return to his sword-dueling ways when the gang he once ran with puts an innocent woman in danger. Coming to this woman’s defense, Magobei is tortured and made to pay for abandoning his people in the past.” Read More »

Akira Kurosawa – Kagemusha [+Extras] (1980)

Just as many American studio-era directors found acclaim abroad that was denied them in their home country, by 1980 Akira Kurosawa’s reputation outside Japan exceeded his esteem at home. As uncompromising as ever, he found considerable difficulty securing backing for his ambitious projects. Unsure he would be able to film it, the director, an aspiring artist before he entered filmmaking, converted Kagemusha into a series of paintings, and it was partly on the basis of these that he won the financial support of longtime admirers Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas. Set in the 16th century, when powerful warlords competed for control of Japan, it offers an examination of the nature of political power and the slipperiness of identity. Read More »

Shirô Toyoda – Jigokuhen AKA Portrait of Hell (1969)

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Synopsis:
A rebellious Korean artist tests the limits of his sadistic patron, an omnipotent feudal Japanese lord. Yoshihide demands a commission to paint screens of the Hell which he sees the egotistical lord’s peasants suffer. Such a public display will challenge the uncaring upper class’ obsession with their own personal beauty. With Chinese and Buddhist influences at a peak in 11th century Japan, the daimyo Horikawa wanted a mural of Buddhist paradise. As Yoshihide’s ghastly artworks appear to come to life, the painter and his patron’s mutual racism also take their toll. Read More »

Kon Ichikawa – Wagahai wa neko de aru AKA I Am A Cat (1975)

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I wasn’t sufficiently acquainted with Kon Ichikawa’s work (and, truthfully, I’m still not), but the entire tone of his relatively obscure I Am a Cat caught me somewhat by surprise. I’d loved Ichikawa’s Fires on the Plain, a deeply and darkly humorous look at the ridiculousness of war played against that looming seriousness that’s always prevalent in those kind of films. I was then ready for some kind of Japanese incarnation of Harry and Tonto. That’s really not what I got, though. I Am a Cat is definitely steeped in comic undertones, with Tatsuya Nakadai almost parodying himself, but it’s absolutely far removed from Harry and Tonto. Instead, we’re left with some odd tribute to Nakadai’s eternally grumpy protagonist and the stray cat who’s his only true confidante. Read More »

Kon Ichikawa – Enjo aka The Temple of the Golden Pavilion (1958)

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The story revolve around a teenage name Mizoguchi, Ever since his father explain the beauty of the Temple of the Golden Pavilion, the surreal ideology of beauty was convey to it. After his father died from Tabeculocus he was then accept by the Monk priest Tayama who was the guardian of the Temple of Gold Pavilion.
When Mizoguchi first saw the golden pavilion, the beauty does not strike him, instead it grow much stronger inside his soul. it was like as if hearing part of the script of melody, the whole ongs will rise naturally. such as the actual image of the golden pavilion one can see the whole temple just by a glips of thought.
The Character Mizoguchi suffers from Stutter, which everyone laugh at him, this sickness makes him feel selfpitty and autism from others, it makes him thinks no one understand his true feeling of how he perceive about life, event or even the temple of golden pavilion. Read More »

Masaki Kobayashi – Inochi bô ni furô aka Inn of Evil (1971)

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Plot Synopsis [SamuraiDVD.com]
This is another masterpiece from filmmaker KOBAYASHI Masaki, noted director of HARA KIRI, KWAIDAN, and SAMURAI REBELLION. The Japanese title is actually translated as “We give our lives for nothing”, and is the true heart and soul of this story. Based on a novel by YAMAMOTO Shugoro, who also wrote the books upon which SANJURO, KILL, and AFTER THE RAIN, were based, it tells the tale of a group of thieves and murderers who find it within themselves to sacrifice their lives with no hope of personal gain. NAKADAI Tatsuya stars as Sada, an expert with knives, whose mysterious past comes to light as he leads a group of fugitives in their last-ditch battle to save their home, a dilapidated inn, which does not welcome strangers in its doors. KATSU Shintaro plays against type in a pivotal role as one of the only outsiders ever allowed to drink at the inn. Tension and suspense lead up to a conclusion like no other. A magnificent motion picture, and a true work of art. Read More »