Tag Archives: Tom Conway

Bernard Knowles – Park Plaza 605 (1953)

Classic British mystery thriller starring Tom Conway as suave gumshoe, Norman
Conquest. After intercepting a secret message, Conquest meets foreign femme fatale,
Nadina Rodin (Eva Bartok), in room 605 of the Park Plaza hotel. When Conquest wakes up
in the room the next morning he is lying next to a corpse and the mysterious Rodin is
nowhere to be seen. Conquest is now the police’s number one murder suspect with
Inspector Williams (Sid James) shadowing his every move. In order to clear his name,
Conquest enlists the help of Pixie Everard (Joy Shelton), but things turn even uglier when
he discovers that the murder is connected to a stash of stolen diamonds. As gun-toting, Read More »

Stanley Logan – The Falcon’s Brother (1942)

Quote:
Gay Lawrence, amateur detective known as The Falcon, learns that his brother Tom has been reported murdered on a ship arriving from South America. Gay pursues the murderers, despite the fact that he knows his brother is still alive. When he is disabled, his brother Tom takes over the case, investigating a fashion magazine involved in secret activities with German infiltrators. Read More »

William Clemens – The Falcon Out West (1944)

The murder of a wealthy, much-married rancher (Lyle Talbot) in a posh Manhattan nightclub is the catalyst for The Falcon Out West. Amateur sleuth Tom Lawrence (Tom Conway), aka The Falcon, deduces that the victim was killed with rattlesnake venom. Read More »

William Berke – The Falcon’s Adventure (1946)

IMDB:
The Falcon rescues Louisa Braganza from kidnappers who want her father’s secret formula for making diamonds. Her father’s murder is pinned on the Falcon and, when he and she flee to Florida, another murder seems to confirm his guilt. Read More »

Ray McCarey – The Falcon’s Alibi (1946)

Plot:
A wealthy woman’s secretary, fearing that she will be blamed if her employer’s jewelry is stolen, hires the Falcon as guardian.

The Falcon is blamed when the jewels are stolen and murders ensue. Read More »

Anthony Mann – Two O’Clock Courage (1945)

UCLA Film and Television Archive writes:
An amnesiac (Tom Conway), aided by a kindly taxi driver (Ann Rutherford), recovers his identity in a citywide search for clues, finding himself at the center of a murder intrigue involving theatrical writers and producers, a stolen play, jealousy and blackmail. It’s a heck of a way to reawaken to the world, but our hero reconstitutes both his identity and the truth in this taut thriller. Read More »

Mark Robson – The Seventh Victim (1943)

Chicago Film Society writes:
Tasked with heading up RKO’s horror unit from 1942 to 1946, producer and screenwriter Val Lewton was responsible for one of the most extraordinary runs of films to ever come out of classic Hollywood. Given modest budgets, lurid titles, and a running-time cap of 75 minutes by his superiors, Lewton, along with up-and-coming directors Mark Robson, Jacques Tourneur, and Robert Wise, produced a string of bewitching, ethereal masterpieces and developed a house style defined by expressive shadows, pervasive melancholy, somnambulism, and ambient dread. One of Lewton’s crowning achievements, The Seventh Victim broke from horror conventions of its time and found darkness lurking not in the vampires and monsters of the old world but in good ol’ American sham psychoanalytics and success-centered occultism. Read More »