Tag Archives: Vincent Price

Richard Whorf – Champagne for Caesar (1950)

An unjustly neglected, extremely funny jab at the media empire and the world of big business. Beauregard Bottomley (Ronald Colman) is an unemployed genius who holds a Ph.D., skims the encyclopedia for enjoyment and never forgets a thing he’s read. He applies for work at a soap company owned by Burbridge Waters (Vincent Price) but is rebuffed by the suds magnate. Beauregard is so annoyed by the treatment he receives at Waters’s hands that he decides to bankrupt the company by becoming a contestant on the popular radio quiz show. Read More »

Roger Corman – Pit and the Pendulum (1961)

Synopsis:
Francis Barnard goes to Spain, when he hears his sister Elizabeth has died. Her husband Nicholas Medina, the son of the brutest torturer of the Spanish Inquisition, tells him she has died of a blood disease, but Francis finds this hard to believe. After some investigating he finds out that it was extreme fear that was fatal to his sister and that she may have been buried alive! Strange things then start to happen in the Medina castle. Read More »

Roger Corman – House of Usher AKA The Fall of the House of Usher (1960)

Synopsis:
After a long journey, Philip arrives at the Usher mansion seeking his loved one, Madeline. Upon arriving, however, he discovers that Madeline and her brother Roderick Usher have been afflicted with a mysterious malady: Roderick’s senses have become painfully acute, while Madeline has become catatonic. That evening, Roderick tells his guest of an old Usher family curse: any time there has been more than one Usher child, all of the siblings have gone insane and died horrible deaths. As the days wear on, the effects of the curse reach their terrifying climax. Read More »

Roger Corman – Tales of Terror (1962) (HD)

Quote:
A capital summarization of Roger Corman’s Poe cycle. The model is L’Amore, the meditation on the director’s art in contrasting moods addressed by the actor — Magnani playing urbane and then peasant for Rossellini, Vincent Price fitting Corman’s sense of the grotesque into august and absurdist guises. Morella, the first tale, gives a deft synthesis of House of Usher and The Pit and the Pendulum. Maggie Pierce enters a crumbling castle, inside are tarantulas in crimson chalices and a cake wrapped in cobwebs, Price is her grief-consumed father, her dead mother (Leona Gage) looms in spirit (an overseeing portrait) and in the flesh (a mummy in the boudoir); the vengeful past averts family healing, so the climax mates incest with necrophilia amid the flames. Read More »

Crane Wilbur – The Bat (1959)

Synopsis:
Mystery writer Cornelia Van Gorder has rented a country house called “The Oaks”, which not long ago had been the scene of some murders committed by a strange and violent criminal known as “The Bat”. Meanwhile, the house’s owner, bank president John Fleming, has recently embezzled one million dollars in securities, and has hidden the proceeds in the house, but he is killed before he can retrieve the money. Thus the lonely country house soon becomes the site of many mysterious and dangerous activities. Read More »

Jacques Tourneur – The Comedy of Terrors (1963)

Synopsis:
Waldo Trumbull (Vincent Price) is an amoral undertaker in 19th-century New England who takes to murdering people to have enough cash to support his drinking habit. Desperate for money after a widow stiffs him for a burial, Trumbull and his assistant, Gillie (Peter Lorre), decide to kill the wealthy Mr. Black (Basil Rathbone), their landlord, to whom they’re indebted. But murdering Black proves to be quite a challenge, as he seems to keep recovering from death every time they do him in. Read More »

William Castle – House on Haunted Hill (1959)

Synopsis:
Eccentric millionaire Fredrick Loren and his 4th wife, Annabelle, have invited 5 people to the house on Haunted Hill for a “haunted House” party. Whoever will stay in the house for one night will earn ten thousand dollars each. As the night progresses, all the guests are trapped inside the house with ghosts, murderers, and other terrors. Read More »