Eberhard Kronhausen & Phyllis Kronhausen – Psychomontage (1963)

From Amos Vogel’s Film as a Subversive Art:
Sexologists, psychologists, and proponents of sexual freedom, the Kronhausens here attempt to induce erotic response in the audience by carefully chosen visual stimuli and juxtapositions (aimed at both conscious and unconscious). Phallic symbols and open orifices, a tongue licking an orange, an unexpected finger entering the frame: almost any object or act, no matter how innocuous, the Kronhausens show, can be made to appear erotic, and reveals our predisposition towards ‘shaping’ visual evidence for purposes of erotic gratification. Read More »

Norman J. Warren – Terror (1978)

Quote:
Back in the 16th Century, a witch is burned by the local Squire but she returns to life to kill him and his wife, and curse all of his descendents. Three hundred years later, a film director, descended from the Squire, has made a film about the curse and is astonished to find that the witch’s hatred is still very much alive. Gradually, people connected with the film begin dying in bizarre circumstances and it begins to look as if no-one in London is safe from the curse. Read More »

Lynne Sachs – Which Way Is East (1994)

When two American sisters travel north from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi, conversations with Vietnamese strangers and friends reveal to them the flip side of a shared history. Lynne and Dana Sachs’ travel diary of their trip to Vietnam is a collection of tourism, city life, culture clash, and historic inquiry that’s put together with the warmth of a quilt. Which Way Is East starts as a road trip and flowers into a political discourse. It combines Vietnamese parables, history and memories of the people the sisters met, as well as their own childhood memories of the war on TV. Read More »

Cliff Owen – Offbeat AKA The Devil Inside (1961)

Quote:
Nifty 70 min long caper film with a twist. William Sylvester is a MI-5 agent who gets transfered to Scotland Yard to help them with a problem. One of their detectives has been killed in a hit and run. Scotland Yard believes the detective was done in by the gang he was trying to infiltrate. The Yard hopes someone from outside the force might have a better chance. Sylvester goes deep undercover as a gunman for hire. He evens pulls a bank heist in order to impress the local underworld. His no nonsense style soon has him in demand with all the proper people. He gains entry to the gang and finds he quite enjoys the lifestyle. Read More »

Wael Shawky – Telematch Sadat (2007)

Telematch Sadat re-stages the 1981 military parade, assassination, and funeral of Egyptian President Anwar Al Sadat—the event which ushered in the dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak—with a cast of Bedouin children. Donkeys and carts stand in for armored vehicles, while the desert substitutes for downtown Cairo. Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – Il Messia AKA The Messiah (1975)

Quote:
Virtually unknown outside of Italy, Messiah (Il Messia) is historically important as the last directorial effort of Roberto Rossellini. In retelling the life of Christ, Rosselini harks back to the humanistic style he’d utilized on his many Italian TV projects of the 1960s. The director has no intention of depicting Jesus as being the vessel of divine providence. The Man from Galilee is shown simply as one who is unusually moral and of spotless character — the sort of person who’d be a natural leader no matter who his Father was. Co-scripted by its director, Messiah was completed in 1975, but not given a general release until 1978. Read More »

Juan A. Gamero – Vivir la utopía AKA Living Utopia (1997)

Quote:
“Living Utopia is a unique documentary that blends the historical account of the origins and development of the Spanish anarchist movement, focussing on the 1936 war. A reflection on the philosophical underpinnings of such a movement and their practical application. As both an informative and inspiring piece of research it is considered a jewel amongst historians and rebel hearts.” Read More »