Veit Harlan – Hanna Amon (1951)

Hanna Amon and her brother Thomas live on an estate they’ve inherited from their parents. Local veterinarian Brunner loves Hanna from afar, and Thomas is in love with the daughter of the local mayor. Love, however, doesn’t always mean happiness, as both Hanna and Thomas are soon to find out. Read More »

    Karl Hartl – Gold (1934)

    Synopsis:
    ‘Hans Albers stars as Werner Holk, an engineer who is working with Professor Achenbach on a machine that will turn lead into gold. When an “accident” occurs that costs the Professor his life, Holk swears vengeance, and determines that the mastermind behind the sabotage was Scottish millionaire John Wills, who has his own rival group working on the same machine. Wills actually hires Holk on to help make his machine a success, and while at first Holk is determined to destroy Wills’ effort from within, when Holk meets Wills’ daughter Florence he begins to second guess his mission.’
    – AlsExGal Read More »

      Lamberto Bava – Macabro aka Macabre (1980)

      Synopsis:
      A New Orleans housewife leaves her daughter and son home alone to meet her lover. While with him, she receives a call that her son has died. Wreckless driving rushing to her house results in a horrible accident. The lover dies and she is sent to a mental institution to recover from the psychological trauma. Upon her release a year later she moves into the boarding house where they would rendezvous. The landlord has passed away and her blind son is left to maintain the house. With every day that passes, his lust for her grows while she remains true to her lover. The situation comes to a “head” on a weekend visit with her daughter. All secrets will be revealed and no one will be the same. Inspired by actual events. Read More »

        Nikos Papatakis – I Fotografia AKA La Photo (1986)

        Quote:
        Ilias Apostolou, a young furrier who has had a hard time under the dictatorship, leaves Castoria in 1971 to emigrate to France, where he hopes to join a distant relative of his, Gerassimos Tzivas, who has been living there since 1950. With him, he takes nothing from his homeland but a photograph of a person that he finds on the pavement. He asks Gerassimos to help him in finding work in Paris. A misunderstanding around the photograph, however, sets off a series of dramatic events. Read More »

          Pat O’Neill – Water and Power (1989)

          ”This rarely screened 1989 masterpiece by Pat O’Neill is a moving meditation on industrialization, focusing on the dystopic desert created by Los Angeles’s vast water consumption. O’Neill conceived the film partly as an answer to Godfrey Reggio’s mind-numbing Koyaanisqatsi (1983), a hypnotic inventory of touristy landscapes showing a world out of balance. In contrast O’Neill creates images full of internal contradictions, using optical printing to collage different locales and suggest the inevitable conflict of industry and nature. One slow dissolve between the Owens Valley desert and Los Angeles at night suggests a direct cause and effect: the city flourished only by despoiling the land. Using time lapse to make weather changes visible, O’Neill renders people as fleeting shadows whose power to alter the landscape fails to mitigate the fragility and shortness of human life on a geologic scale.” – Fred Camper, The Chicago Reader Read More »

            George Fitzmaurice & Frank Lloyd – Lilac Time (1928)

            All of those handsome young men in their flying machines are billeted in a field next to the Widow Berthelot’s farmhouse in France. Her daughter Jeannine is curious about the young men fighting for England in World War I and their airplanes. Then one of the aviators is killed. His replacement is Captain Philip Blythe who can’t help but notice Jeannine. When he lands the first time, she is standing in the middle of his “runway.” She makes a more favorable impression when he sees her later by the lilacs. When all of the young men depart on a mission, Blythe promises to return. Read More »

              Jane Arden & Jack Bond – Anti-Clock (1980)

              Quote:
              A complex and fascinating experimental exploration of time and identity. Anti-Clock is a film of authentic, startling originality.

              Brilliantly mixing cinema and video techniques, Arden and Bond have created a movie that captures the anxiety and sense of danger that has infiltrated the consciousness of so many people in western society.

              Filled with high tension and high intelligence, Anti-Clock is mysterious, disturbing, fascinating and exciting’. (Jack Kroll, Newsweek) Read More »