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Jacques Rouffio – La passante du Sans-Souci AKA The Passerby (1982)

Max Baumstein is a reputable businessman, a rich self-made man with a conscience – he founded a highly visible and active international organization fighting against violations of human rights. Why would he commit an act that apparently negates the principles he has striven for so long to uphold? Eventually, he reveals a secret about himself that he kept hidden from his younger wife Lina, and that in a roundabout way concerns her as well. It is the conclusion of a struggle that started many decades earlier, when Elsa Wiener, a German singer exiled in Paris, without money or relations, a refugee among many others, faced two daunting problems: surviving in a foreign city, and saving her husband Michel from the clutches of the Nazis. Read More »

Joe May – Ihre Majestät die Liebe AKA Her Majesty Love (1931)

Quote:
The story is pleasent fluff where Franz Lederer has to marry a rich woman in order to be chief executive of a big firm. He pretends to be in love Käthe von Nagy’s bar girl and just guess how this story could end. Read More »

Harve Foster & Wilfred Jackson – Song of the South (1946)

Quote:
Song of the South is a blend of live action and animation, based on the popular “Uncle Remus” stories of Joel Chandler Harris. Set in the years just after the Civil War, the story begins with young Johnny (Bobby Driscoll) being sent to live at the southern plantation of his grandmother (Lucile Watson) while his parents contemplate divorce. At first disconsolate, the boy is cheered up by African-American handyman Uncle Remus (James Baskett), who tells him many delightful fables concerning the clever trickster Br’er Rabbit, whose adventures are illustrated in cartoon form. Each story has a moral, which Johnny applies to the exigencies of his real life. Johnny’s mother (Ruth Warrick) disapproves of Uncle Remus, and orders the boy never to visit the kindly old black man again. Uncle Remus packs his bags and leaves; while chasing after him, Johnny is injured by a bull. He recovers thanks to the friendly presence of Uncle Remus, and all is forgiven. Read More »

Octavio Getino & Fernando E. Solanas – La hora de los hornos AKA The Hour of the Furnaces (1968)

Nicole Brenez for BFI wrote:
Made in Argentina in 1968, The Hour of the Furnaces (La hora de los hornos) is the film that established the paradigm of revolutionary activist cinema. “For the first time,” said one of its writers, Octavio Getino, “we demonstrated that it was possible to produce and distribute a film in a non-liberated country with the specific aim of contributing to the political process of liberation.” The film is not just an act of courage, it’s also a formal synthesis, a theoretical essay and the origin of several contemporary image practices. Read More »

Yoshimitsu Morita – Tokimeki ni shisu AKA Deaths in Tokimeki (1984)

An emotionless hit man is sent on a mission to a remote town. There he stays with a caretaker / driver / servant / doctor who is given minimal instruction over the phone by “the organization.” A prostitute joins them. Death is inevitable, but whose? Read More »

Claudia Weill – Girlfriends (1978)

Aspiring photographer Susan Weinblatt (Melanie Mayron) and would-be poet Anne Munroe (Anita Skinner) are best friends and roommates in a fivie-flight walk-up on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. But one day Anne decides to marry and move out. When the best friends go their separate ways, Girlfriends focuses on what happens to the one left behind. It’s about valuable, delicate, and complex ties that bind people–girlfriends, boyfriends, husbands, and lovers. Producer/director Claudia Weill captures the offbeat charm and edgy moments of city life, as well as a gem of a performance by Mayron in her first starring role. Read More »

João Vladimiro – Lacrau (2013) (HD)

SYNOPSIS
The viper is deaf and the scorpion can’t see, so it is and so shall be, the same way the countryside is peaceful and the city bustling and the human being impossible to satisfy. Lacrau demands the return “to the curve where man got lost” in a journey from the city towards nature. The escape from chaos and emotional void we call progress; matter without spirit, without will. The search for the most ancient sensations and relationships of mankind. The amazement, the fear of the unknown, the loss of basic comforts, loneliness, the meeting with the other, the other animal, the other vegetable.
A dive looking for a connection with the world. Where beginning and end are the same, but I am not. Read More »