1951-1960

Frank Tashlin – The Girl Can’t Help It (1956)

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Description:
The Alphabet Murders is a 1965 British detective film based on the novel The A.B.C. Murders by Agatha Christie, starring Tony Randall as Hercule Poirot. The part of Poirot had originally been intended for Zero Mostel but the film was delayed because Agatha Christie objected to the script. The film varies significantly from the novel and emphasises comedy. Read More »

Mikhail Kalatozov – Vikhri vrazhdebnye AKA The Hostile Whirlwinds (1953)

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Description:
About the life and work of F.Dzerzhinsky in 1918-1921. Read More »

Frank Tashlin – Artists and Models (1955)

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Jonathan Rosenbaum of the Chicago Reader wrote:

Quote:
The best Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis movie (1955) is also Frank Tashlin’s best feature at Paramount, a satire about the comic book craze with explosive uses of color and VistaVision, better-than-average songs, and much-better-than-average costars, especially Dorothy Malone and Shirley MacLaine (the latter giving Lewis a run for his money in terms of goofy mugging). Martin and Malone are comic book artists, MacLaine is a model for the Bat Lady, and Lewis is a deranged fan whose dreams wind up inspiring (or is it duplicating?) comic book stories and the coded messages of communist spies—or something like that. Five cowriters are credited along with Tashlin, but the stylistic exuberance is seamless, and this film eventually wound up providing the inspirational spark for Jacques Rivette’s late, great New Wave extravaganza Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974). With Eva Gabor and Anita Ekberg. 109 min. Read More »

Andrei Blaier – Prima melodie AKA The First Melody (1958)

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no info to be found anywhere about this one. It’s a little, simple, gentle story about first love, with a bit too much of a melodramatic overtone if you ask me. Nice however if you are curious about Romanian film in the 50s. Read More »

Yves Robert – Ni Vu, Ni Connu AKA Neither Seen Nor Recognized (1958)

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Synopsis
Ni Vu, Ni Connu (Neither Seen Nor Recognized) is built around the talents of rubber-faced Gallic comedian Louis De Funes. Our hero is a poacher in a small provincial village, who always manages to stay one step ahead of the Law. Through a fluke, De Funes finds himself the town’s Leading Citizen when he is falsely arrested on another charge, forcing the village elders to bend over backwards making amends.

Blaireau, un braconnier très adroit, ravitaille tout le pays en gibier. Un soir, son ennemi de toujours, le garde champêtre Parju, se fait rosser. Ce dernier, persuadé, à tort, d’être la victime de Blaireau, le fait arrêter. Néanmoins, grâce à un directeur de prison compréhensif et aux attentions de la belle Arabella, son séjour en cellule ne sera pas trop rude. D’autant plus que « l’erreur judiciaire » sera découverte, Parju ridiculisé et le retour de Blaireau au village sera triomphal. Read More »

Frigyes Bán & Vladislav Pavlovic – Szent Péter esernyöje AKA St. Peter’s Umbrella (1958)

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Plot / Synopsis

The movie St. Peter’s Umbrella, is an adaptation of one of the best-known works of Kálmán Mikszáth, and based on a real-life story. In the plot, a new priest is appointed in Glogova, a town in the Hungarian highlands. The priest has to take care of his two-year-old orphaned sister, Veronka. On a summer day, she is sheltered from a shower by an umbrella put above her. As people begin to gossip that the mysterious helper was Saint Peter himself, the umbrella becomes a holy relic bringing a lot of money. Yet one day the truth is revealed: the benefactor was not Saint Peter and the umbrella is indeed worth a fortune. A bitter chase begins, at the end of which something far more precious than money is found. The enchanting story is in fact a fully elaborated anecdote about finding happiness in discovering sincere love rather than in the pursuit of wealth. Read More »

Fritz Lang – Der Tiger von Eschnapur AKA The Tiger of Eschnapur (1959)

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Quote:
“Der Tiger von Eschnapur” is a visual splendor, with an unusually inventive use of color, which is not unlike his British peer Michael Powell (Black orchid,thief of Bagdad).Lang was an architect ,and it’s impossible not to feel it,here more than in his entire American period. It’s no coincidence if his hero (Henri Mercier/Harald Berger) is an architect too;they are always holding and studying plans .Lang’s camera perfectly captures the space it describes .Mercier (Paul Hubschmid)is often filmed in high angle shot,in the huge palace of the Maharajah,in the tiger pit ,or later,in the second part ,in the dungeon where he’s imprisoned.Actually,and it’s obvious,it takes us back to Lang’s German silent era ,particularly “der müde Tod” “die Niebelungen” and “Metropolis”. Read More »