Action

John Shepphird – Teenage Bonnie and Klepto Clyde (1993)

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The Bonnie & Clyde story is re-told from a contemporary viewpoint. Clyde in this movie is a high school nerd working in the local burger joint. Urges to steal things are inflamed when he runs into Bonnie, the bored daughter of the local police commissioner, who is running with a street gang led by Kirk. Clyde immediately senses a kindred spirit in Bonnie. Initially she ignores him, but he rescues her from a shop-lifting charge and offers her a ride in a stolen van. Soon the two have taken guns from her father’s home and go off on a bloody crime spree… Written by John S. Read More »

Duccio Tessari – Zorro (1975)

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Plot:
The internationally produced Zorro is set in South America instead of the California locales of the series.
Alain Delon stars as the newly appointed governor who immediately butts heads with corrupt Colonel Huerta. To rescue the peasants from Huerta’s despotry, the governor becomes the caped-and-masked do-gooder Zorro.
The film never really takes itself seriously, not even during the final, well-staged duel between Zorro and Huerta. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Read More »

Shinya Tsukamoto – Tetsuo: The Bullet Man (2009)

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– from Variety-

“POWERED BY
A Tetsuo Group presentation of a Kaijyu Theater, Asmik Ace Entertainment production. (International sales: the Coproduction Office, Paris.) Produced by Shinichi Kawahara, Masayuki Tanishima.
Directed by Shinya Tsukamoto. Screenplay, Tsukamoto, Hisakatsu Kuroki.

With: Erik Bossick, Akiko Monou, Shinya Tsukamoto, Stephen Sarrazin, Yuko Nakamura, Tiger Charlie Gerhardt.
(English dialogue)

Twenty years after making his breakout cult hit, “Tetsuo,” and 17 years after its sequel, “Tetsuo II: Body Hammer,” multihyphenate filmmaker Shinya Tsukamoto busts out the big guns again with “Tetsuo the Bullet Man.” Contempo-set pic doesn’t bring much new to the half-man-half-machine concept, but with its delirious editing and eardrum-crunching soundtrack, it punches above its weight and musters a certain retro charm with its old-school effects, all done on about one-hundredth of the budget of a “Transformers” movie. Fans of the franchise will have this in their sights and show support, but crossover potential looks iffy. Read More »