Aleksey German Jr.

  • Aleksey German Jr. – Bumazhnyy soldat AKA Paper Soldier (2008)

    In 1961, a Soviet medical officer is conflicted about his position overseeing the health of future cosmonauts.Read More »

  • Aleksey German Jr. – Delo AKA House Arrest (2021)

    Quote:
    David, a university professor, takes to social media to criticize his city’s administration. But instead of the mayor’s dodgy dealings being investigated, David is himself accused of embezzlement and placed under house arrest. Despite the overbearing surveillance, double-crossing acquaintances, and growing media interest, David remains defiant and will not apologise. With the court case drawing ever nearer, does David have any hope of winning this battle against Goliath?Read More »

  • Aleksey German Jr. – Dovlatov (2018)


    Dovlatov charts six days in the life of brilliant, ironic writer who saw far beyond the rigid limits of 70s Soviet Russia. Sergei Dovlatov fought preserve his own talent and decency with poet and writer Joseph Brodsky while watching his artist friends getting crushed by the iron-willed state machinery.Read More »

  • Aleksey German Jr. – Pod elektricheskimi oblakami AKA Under Electric Clouds (2015)

    29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

    Quote:
    Aleksey German Jr., son of famed Russian auteur Aleksey German, comes into his own prominence with his third feature Under Electric Clouds, which took home a cinematography award following its premiere at the 2015 Berlin Film Festival. Much like his father’s cinema, German announces similar interests in existentialist societal woes impervious to logical narrative format, and exchanges deliberations of the past (his previous title, Paper Soldier takes place in 1961) for the looming future of 2017 (a date that may dawn before the title premieres in certain international markets). With production delayed so German could put the finishing touches on his father’s posthumous masterpiece, Hard to Be a God, this indictment on the decaying cultural state of Russia tuned exactly one hundred years after the Russian Revolution is a critique as obscurely damning as it elusively oblique in tone. Some spectacular imagery providing a backdrop for overly pointed dialogue manages to settle under your skin despite its sometimes mystifying qualities.Read More »

Back to top button