Barbara Hammer

  • Barbara Hammer – Psychosynthesis (1975)

    Synopsis wrote:
    “The sub-personalities of me, as baby, athlete, witch and artist are synthesized in this film of superimpositions, intensities, and color layers coming together through the powers of film.” — Barbara HammerRead More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Nitrate Kisses (1992)

    Synopsis wrote:
    In her first feature, after decades as a pioneer of lesbian cinema, Barbara Hammer weaves striking images of four contemporary gay and lesbian couples with footage of an unearthed, forbidden, and invisible history, searching eroded emulsions and images for lost vestiges of queer culture. Questions of historic representation are examined through addressing the margins, between-the-line readings, and images outside of prescribed textual boundaries. Archival footage from Lot In Sodom (1933), often regarded as the first queer film made in the United States, as well as footage from German narrative and documentary films of the thirties, are interwoven with contemporary footage in this multi-faceted, haunting documentary.Read More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Jane Brakhage (1974)

    Synopsis wrote:
    “I picked up Stan and Jane Brakhage at the airport and drove them to San Francisco State College where Stan spoke about his films to the student body. I was fascinated with Jane. She was so interested in the world around her while Stan seemed caught up only in his ideas. She picked seed pods from trees and plants and told me she had written a lexicon of dog language. She was so much more complex than Stan’s portrayal of her in Window Water Baby Moving (1958) that I decided to make a documentary about her for my graduate project.” — Barbara HammerRead More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Sisters! (1974)

    Synopsis wrote:
    Combining perhaps the only footage from the first Women’s International Day march in San Francisco and rare footage of the second National Lesbian Conference at UCLA, Sisters! is a joyous and vital landmark in feminist, queer, and lesbian filmmaking.

    Preservation information wrote:
    Preserved by BB Optics and the Academy Film Archive. Preservation of this film was made possible by a grant from The Women’s Film Preservation Fund.Read More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Audience (1982)

    Synopsis
    An incredible document of the LGBT film scene in the early 1980s (as well as artist Barbara Hammer’s off-the-charts charisma), AUDIENCE finds Hammer working in a more straightforward documentary mode than usual. Hammer interviews her largely lesbian audiences before and after screenings of her work, capturing their reactions to her radical, erotic, experimental films.Read More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Women I Love (1979)

    A series of cameo portraits of the filmmaker’s friends and lovers intercut with a playful celebration of fruits and vegetables in nature.Read More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Devotion: A Film About Ogawa Productions (2000)

    Shinsuke Ogawa began his career in filmmaking in the early 1960’s, directing industrial films for Japanese public relations firms, but he had a desire to make films of greater consequence, and left his job to become an independent documentarian. Ogawa examined the rise of the Student Left in Japan in 1966’s Sea of Youth and 1967’s The Oppressed Students, and in 1968, as protest among the young became an international phenomenon, Ogawa and a handful of like-minded young filmmakers set up a collective house in rural Sanrizuka. A growing number of young activist filmmakers joined Ogawa in their new home, where they made documentaries focusing on the battle between the builders of Toyko International Airport and the farmers who would be displaced by the project and refused to leave. Read More »

  • Barbara Hammer – Maya Deren’s Sink (2011)

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    This evocative tribute to the mother of American avantgarde film calls forth the spirit of one who was larger than life as recounted by those who knew her. Friends and contemporaries float through her homes, recalling in tiny bits and pieces words of Deren’s architectural and personal interior space. Clips from her films are projected back into the spaces where they were originally filmed. Fluid light projections of intimate space provide an elusive agency for a filmmaker most of us will never know.”
    BERLINALERead More »

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