Carlo Lizzani

  • Christian-Jaque, Carlo Lizzani, Werner Klingler & Terence Young – La guerra segreta AKA The Dirty Game (1965)

    Synopsis:
    ‘The US intelligence chief in Europe relates the stories of three different operations that he was involved in with colleagues in Paris and Djibouti, Rome, and Berlin.’Read More »

  • Carlo Lizzani – Mussolini ultimo atto AKA The Last Days of Mussolini (1974)

    In 1945, Benito Mussolini goes to Milan to talk with Archbishop Alfredo Ildefonso Schuster to request his help in escaping from Italy. The Republic of Salò, the last bastion of fascism, is decaying, and the Americans, along with the partisans are about to win control of Milan. Mussolini flees, pursued by his lover Claretta Petacci, and manages to get to the northern village of Dongo. There he clashes with the Germans, who order him to disguise himself as an officer of Germany rather than be captured by the partisans. Mussolini accepts without objection, always hoping for a revolt of his loyal fascists, but they are in jeopardy. When Mussolini is recognised, Walter Audisio, the leader of the partisans, initially wants to hand him over to the Americans, so that Mussolini undergoes due process. But the war crimes of the Duce are too great, so Audisio makes the decision to shoot him in front of the Villa Belmonte in the village of Giulino, along with his female companion.Read More »

  • Carlo Lizzani – L’amante di Gramigna AKA The Bandit (1969)

    Sinopsis

    Gramigna and his father are robbed of their field by Baron Nardò. The Baron let the field to Assunta and Gemma that is secretly beloved of Gramigna. Gemma succeeded to escape with Gramigna the day of her marriage with Ramarro. Love, violence, murder, revenge will follow all the protagonists till the desperate end of their existences.
    – Written by 1felcoRead More »

  • Carlo Lizzani – La casa del tappeto giallo AKA House of the Yellow Carpet (1983)

    Kevin Lyons on EOFFTV wrote:
    By the early 1980s, the giallo – that uniquely Italian blend of thriller and horror tropes laced with plenty of sex – was facing its final curtain. Dario Argento would return to the form throughout the decade but just about everyone else was getting ready to give up on it as Italian horror lurched towards the more visceral in the wake of Lucio Fulci’s worldwide success with Zombi 2 / Zombie Flesheaters Zombie [1979]. Those gialli that were still being made seemed a pale imitation of the excesses of their 1970s forebears.Read More »

  • Carlo Lizzani – Achtung! Banditi! (1951)

    During the winter of 1944, near Genoa, a group of Italian partisans embark on a mission to recover weaponry from a factory controlled by the Nazis. This is a gritty and gripping war drama starring Andrea Checchi and Gina Lollobrigida.
    It is also the first feature film directed by Carlo Lizzani, who had spent the years up to this point making a series of short documentaries, as well as working as scriptwriter and assistant director to Roberto Rossellini, Alberto Lattuada and Giuseppe De Santis.Read More »

  • Carlo Lizzani – Banditi a Milano AKA The Violent Four (1968)

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    Description: As public outrage mounts against organized crime in modern-day Milan, four robbers meticulously plan a timed assault on several major banks within a period of 40 minutes. Led by the mastermind Cavallero, the men have pulled off other robberies in the past, keeping their identities secret by leading seemingly law-abiding lives. While making their getaway after one robbery, however, there is a slip-up, and the men must blast their way through the streets with submachine guns, killing several innocent bystanders in an effort to escape from the police. Three of the robbers escape, but a fourth, Rovoletto, is wounded and captured. The city is blockaded with the latest electronic devices, and police inspector Basevi questions Rovoletto, who finally breaks down. Lopez, the youngest gang member, is easily captured in his home, but Cavallero and Notarnicola evade the police dragnet. Before long, however, they are tracked down and cornered in an abandoned farmhouse. While being brought back to headquarters by Basevi, Cavallero boasts that his crimes have made him as famous as the Sicilian bandits of old, but he is shocked when a mob of irate citizens surround the police car, cursing and spitting at him.
    Read More »

  • Carlo Lizzani – Esterina (1959)

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    Plot
    Esterina, a young war orphan, joins two truck drivers, Gino and Piero, on their trips along Northern Italy. She wants to find her luck in the big city, but her dreams turn into disappointing experiences. She falls in love with Gino but he is not interested in her, until she disappears…Read More »

  • Marco Bellocchio, Bernardo Bertolucci, Jean-Luc Godard, Carlo Lizzani, Pier Paolo Pasolini – Amore e rabbia aka Love and Anger (1969)

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    Synopsis:
    Love and Anger is a collection of five stories that are the handiwork of directors that have made names for themselves in decidedly different ways among the annals of foreign cinema. The heavy hitters of the time are all on board, including Bernardo Bertolucci (The Last Emperor, Partner), Marco Bellocchio (Devil in the Flesh), Carlo Lizzani (Requiescant), Pier Paolo Pasolini (Salo), and, a huge treat, the legendary Jean-Luc Godard (Band of Outsiders, Breathless). Most of these films are extremely surreal, but they all have political undertones. This actually works out quite well, as even if you aren’t familiar with the political climate in Italy and France during the 1960s, you can revel in these masters’ liberal use of inventive imagery, much of which never comes completely together in a standard narrative structure. The actors come from a pair of renowned theater groups: the Living Theater and Andy Warhol Factory, and include Julian Beck, who made his mark in Hollywood as the creepy preacher in Poltergeist II.Read More »

  • Various – 12 registi per 12 città (1989)

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    Promotional omnibus film, made for the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy, featuring portraits of 12 Italian cities.
    For all those who will not be going to Italy for a vacation this year… here is the next best thing. A who’s who of Italian directors anno 1990 turn their cameras on a specific Italian city. Most of these (very) short films do not have dialogue of any kind, and rely instead solely on the beauty of the images and music to depict the various cities.

    Directed by
    Michelangelo Antonioni (segment “Roma”)
    Bernardo Bertolucci (segment “Bologna”)
    Giuseppe Bertolucci (segment “Bologna”)
    Mauro Bolognini (segment “Palermo”)
    Alberto Lattuada (segment “Genova”)
    Carlo Lizzani (segment “Cagliari”)
    Mario Monicelli (segment “Verona”)
    Ermanno Olmi (segment “Milano”)
    Gillo Pontecorvo (segment “Udine”)
    Francesco Rosi (segment “Napoli”)
    Mario Soldati (segment “Torino”)
    Lina Wertmüller (segment “Bari”)
    Franco Zeffirelli (segment “Firenze”)
    Read More »

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