Danièle Huillet

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Europa 2005 – 27 octobre (2006)

Europa 2005 – 27 octobre

Shot in Clichy Sous Bois, cauldron of the suburban riots that burned the winter of 2005, and composed of two panoramic shots of the substantion where Bouna and Zyed were killed whilst being pursued by the police. There is no voiceover and only one title to be translated for entire duration of this short: :Chambre a Gaz, Chaise Electrique” or “Gas Chamber, Electric Chair”. These shots and movements are repeated five times. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Il viandante (2001)

This short movie came out of the alternative takes of a scene of Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub’s previous film, Gente da Sicília (1999) and consists of a dialogue between an old woman and a man. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – L’arrotino (2001)

This short movie came out of the alternative takes of a scene of Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub’s previous film, Gente da Sicília (1999) and consists of a dialogue between a grinder and a foreigner. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Von heute auf morgen aka From Today Until Tomorrow (1997)

Quote:
Based on an unknown Schönberg opera from 1929, From Today Until Tomorrow explores one night in a not-quite loveless marriage. A husband and wife return from a party where she has flirted with another man, while he has cast an appraising eye toward an attractive, fashionably dressed acquaintance of his wife’s. Though each dreams, briefly, of leaving the marriage for the excitement and mystery of a new lover, in the end they decide stability and comfort are more important than the fleeting thrill of new romance. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Machorka-Muff (1963) (HD)

Quote:
The caustic, satirical tone of Machorka-Muff is immediately evident, but successive viewings will reward spectators as they become more familiar with the nuances of Böll’s text—to which the film owes a great deal of its incisiveness—and will be more able to appreciate the precise orchestration executed by Straub and Huillet of the relations between sound and image, of tensions between voice, gesture, tempo, and action. The film’s opening—combining, in barely 48 seconds, extreme concision, lucid insight, and brutal parody—offers us an excellent example of this.

— Cristina Álvarez López, Mubi Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Sicilia! (1999)

Synopsis
After many years away, Silvestro returns from northern Italy to the Sicilian countryside of his childhood to visit his mother. On his journey, he has conversations with strangers in a port, fellow passengers on a train, his mother, and a knife-sharpener. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Les yeux ne veulent pas en tout temps se fermer, ou Peut-être qu’un jour Rome se permettra de choisir à son tour AKA Eyes Do Not Want to Close at All Times or Perhaps One Day Rome Will Permit Herself to Choose in Her Turn AKA Othon (1970)

Quote:
Straub-Huillet’s first color film, Othon (Les yeux ne veulent pas en tout temps se fermer, ou Peut-être qu’un jour Rome se permettra de choisir à son tour) adapts a lesser-known Corneille tragedy from 1664, which in turn was based on an episode of imperial court intrigue chronicled in Tacitus’s Histories. The costuming is classical, and the toga-clad, nonprofessional cast performs the drama’s original French text amid the ruins of Rome’s Palatine Hill while the noise of contemporary urban life hums in the background. Their lines are executed with a terrific flatness and frequently through heavy accents; the language in Othon becomes not merely an expression but a thing itself, an element whose plainness here alerts us to qualities of the work that might otherwise be subordinated. “If at every moment one can keep one’s eyes and ears open to all of this,” Straub wrote, “it’s possible to even find the film thrilling and note that everything here is information—even the purely sensual reality of the space which the actors leave empty at the end of each act. Read More »