Ebrahim Golestan

Ebrahim Golestan – Tappe-haye Marlik AKA The Hills of Marlik (1963)

A beautiful short by the Iranian director about the archaelogical excavations in the area of the Marlik hills. Narrated by Golestan, the film features a reflective voice-over text exploring the lives, hopes and myths of the people who once lived there and who live there today. A very lyrical film, and a small masterpiece. Read More »

Ebrahim Golestan – Tappe-haye Marlik AKA The Hills of Marlik (1963)

The Hills of Marlik (1963, 15 min.) beautifully and suggestively documents archaeological excavations.

Directed and narrated by Ebrahim Golestan. Read More »

Ebrahim Golestan – Khesht va Ayeneh AKA Brick and Mirror (1965) (HD)

Hashem (Zakariya Hashemi) is a cab driver who finds an infant child in the back seat of his cab one night after he gives a ride to a young woman. Hashem and his girlfriend, Taji (Taji Ahmadi), try to cope with this unwanted child. Hashem insists on getting rid of the child, Taji on keeping him. Read More »

Ebrahim Golestan – Asrar ganj dareheye jenni AKA The ghost valley’s treasure mysteries (1974)

Quote:
The Ghost Valley’s Treasure Mysteries (in Persian: اسرار گنج دره جنی, transliterated as Asrar-e Ganj-e Darre-ye Jenni), also known as “The Secrets of the Treasure of the Jinn Valley”, is a 1974 satirical comedy Iranian film, directed by Ebrahim Golestan. It was released by Golestan Films, and was Golestan’s last feature film in Iran. Using symbolic language, the director was accused of having the Shah’s support.

Very bad quality, but apparently the only way to see this movie by Ebrahim Golestan. Read More »

Ebrahim Golestan – Ganjine-haye gohar AKA The crown jewels of Iran (1965)

Quote:
Made for the Central Bank of Iran to celebrate the collection of precious jewels kept in the treasury, this film remains filmmaker Ebrahim Golestan’s most visually dazzling work, embellished with terrific camera movements.

Some of the most iconic landscape photography in the history of Iranian cinema can be found within a minute after the opening credits, in which peasants of various ethnicities and tribes are quickly reviewed, all posed in a graceful manner, like kings without being kings. Like a work of musical composition, a simple act of ploughing is spread across shots of various size and angle, creating an intimate visual symphony. And then appears one of Golestan’s allegorical match-cuts: a farmer seen on the horizon before a cut to a diamond on a dark background – the farmer is the jewel. Read More »