France

Philippe Garrel – Le vent de la nuit aka Night Wind (1999)

Le Vent de la Nuit bears little resemblance to the first film in our series, Les Amants Réguliers, made only six years later. The latter, with its rich, fathomless depths of black-and-white photography and insular, period setting stands in stark relief to the former’s auburn-tinged, deep-focus, wide-angle lensing of modern-day Paris, Naples and Berlin. Even so, Le Vent is unmistakably a film by Philippe Garrel, with its deliberate pacing, recurring themes of bitter regret, lost love and longing across generations and relentless focus on the emotional landscape of its three central characters, all which immediately connect it to his other work. Read More »

Claude Lelouch – Les Misérables (1995)

Quote:
This is one of the greatest films ever made. Mark my words. History will bear me out.
Acclaimed French filmmaker Claude Lelouch, whose classic examinations of intimate emotions
include the Oscar-nominated “A Man and A Woman,” paints a sweeping portrait of the human
condition in his epic drama “Les Miserables,” a twentieth-century tale inspired by the
nineteenth-century masterpiece of French writer Victor Hugo. Lelouch’s “Les Miserables”
focuses on two French families who struggle, hope, suffer and ultimately find love and
friendship in the face of nearly insurmountable odds.
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Georges Franju – Mon chien AKA My Dog (1955)

A family goes on holiday, abandoning the little girl’s dog.

Quote:
Faithful regulars at screenings at La Cinémathèque française, the filmmakers of the New Wave received Langlois’s lessons as an inheritance and were, by their own admission, profoundly influenced by them. On the fringe of these habits and this famous movement, other directors, more fragile or isolated, also carried in them, thanks to other roundabout means, the teachings of the Cinémathèque’s founder who had, himself, briefly trod the path of apprentice filmmaker. In touch with young directors, he supported them as much as he could, showing their works, often previously unseen, and rightly considered it his duty to watch over them. Read More »

Philippe Lioret – Welcome (2009)

A young Kurdish refugee finds friendship from an unlikely source in Welcome, writer-director Philippe Lioret’s dramatic (chronicle of intersecting lives. The tale unfurls in Calais, a seaside community in the north of France where one can glimpse the white cliffs of Dover, England with the naked eye. Vincent Lindon stars as Simon, a local swimming instructor privately reeling in turmoil because he dreads an imminent divorce from his wife (Audrey Dana). Soon, his path unexpectedly criss-crosses with that of Bilal (Firat Ayverdi), a 17-year-old Kurdish refugee with two aspirations: swim the English Channel, and join his girlfriend in England following a lengthy separation. Despite their differing ages, the two men discover that they have a fair amount in common, and soon forge a tight bond marked by similar goals.) Read More »

Leos Carax – Holy Motors (2012) (HD)

Quote:
We follow 24 hours in the life of a being (DL) moving from life to life like a cold and solitary assassin moving from hit to hit. In each of these interwoven lives, the being possesses an entirely distinct identity: sometimes a man, sometimes a woman, sometimes youthful, sometimes old to the point of dying; sometimes destitute, sometimes wealthy. By turns murderer, beggar, company chairman, monstrous creature, worker, family man…

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Bruno Dumont – Jeannette, l’enfance de Jeanne d’Arc (2017)

Synopsis “Jeanette” is a musical drama based on Charles Peguy’s play “Le Mystère de la charité de Jeanne d’Arc” (1910). It focuses on the part of Peguy’s play that deals with Joan of Arc as a child, from age 8-12, when she started to embrace her sacred mission.

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Jean-Luc Godard – Le petit soldat AKA The Little Soldier (1963)



During the Algerian War, Bruno Forestier lives in Geneva to escape the enlistment in France. Working for French intelligence, he is ordered to kill Palivoda, who is pro-FLN (National Liberation Front of Algeria), to prove he is not a double agent. Refusal and hesitation keep him from carrying out the assassination.

Meanwhile, he meets and falls in love with Véronica Dreyer, who helped the FLN. Bruno plans to leave with her for Brazil, but is captured and tortured by Algerian revolutionaries.

He escapes, and agrees to kill Palivoda for the French in exchange for passage to Brazil for himself and Veronica. However, the French discover Veronica’s ties to the FLN, and torture her to death. (Wikipedia) Read More »